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Full text of "Pilgrim"

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Dedicated 

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hju}Jx School 



Our Principal's Message 

I want to pay a tribute to a girl who was a member of this school a 
good many years ago — before most of you were born. I shall not attempt 
to describe her lest she be identified, and also because the description 
might well be considered cruel. And that girl is just about the last person 
I'd want to do an unkindness to, even unintentionally. 

Like most girls of that age her physical appearance was important to 
her. Not that she had any notions about becoming glamorous — in fact, 
in her inmost heart I think she must have known that was impossible. 
To put it kindly, her looks must at best have been a great disappointment 
to her. Take my word for it, she was anything but easy to look upon. And 
the poor child knew it. 

When first she came to us her disposition was on a par with her ex- 
terior, and she was a difficult person to get along with. But whether it was 
because some classmate talked to her — or it may have been her mother, 
or a teacher, or an older friend — or whether she worked it out for herself 
through the normal, friendly contacts with the other pupils then in this 
school, a great change took place in her personality toward the end of her 
Sophomore year. Looking back, I can't pretend that I was able to see into 
her mind any further than at present I can see into yours, but it was as 
though she had said to herself: "I shall never be Miss America, nor come 
anywhere near that kind of distinction — but I can be a pleasant person 
so that people can grow to like me." 

Her first efforts in this direction were somewhat ludicrous for she 
tried too hard and the artificiality was all too apparent. I think there were 
times when it must have been close to heartbreak for her. But she per- 
sisted, and in time, as her response to people came more from her heart 
and less from her determination, her personality positively flowered. 1 
know that is an extravagant way of putting it, but it does describe what 
happened. 

It is pleasant, indeed heart-warming, to record that all of this "paid 
off" for her. By the time she was graduated I think she was one of the 
most genuinely liked girls in the school. Unfailingly courteous, always 
pleasant, ready to help when help was needed, I know that those of us who 
knew her then no longer saw the ungainly, homely girl that our eyes 
rested upon, but the steadfast, warm-hearted friend, always generous in 
sympathy and understanding. 

I don't know where she is now, and I can't say that she had then or has 
now, a song in her heart — in fact in the early days I suspect more 
often had a lump in her throat — but she did her best to put a song in our 
hearts, and more often than not she succeeded. 

So wherever she is I salute her and commend her example to you. It 
is all too easy for us to focus our attention on the slights and petty injustices 
the world deals out to us, to gripe and grumble because we can't have 
things our way — but too much concern with one's self (and envy is usually 
the root of this) results only in an ingrown disposition. And few things 
fester quite so badly as that. 

Perhaps we can't all have a song in our hearts, perhaps if we did even our 
friends might find all that joy a bit trying at times; but since we do live in 
the world with many other people I don't think it would hurt if we all tried 
to be more pleasant about it. Metaphorically I take off my hat to the girl 
who gave me the most convincing practical demonstration of this. 

EDGAR J. MONGAN 



Pilgrim Staff 

1954 -- 1955 



Editor-in-Chief — Carol Foley 

Junior Assistant Editor — Claire Vancini 

Literary Editor — Marcia Hasz 
Carol Ann Greaves, Asst. 

Business Staff — Philip Canevazzi, Manager 

Robert Miskelly, Alan Sherman, Assts.; Peter Miller, Phillip Sherman, 
Elliot Segal, Elizabeth Tubman, William Horton, Ethel Bussolari, 
Stephen Buttner, George Sampson 

Art Staff — Carol Harney, Editor 

Richard Fernandes, Mary Po, Wanda Weeks 

Senior Statistics — Douglas Beane, Editor 

Jean Caron, Asst.; Rita Dietlin, Winsor Savery, Elliot Segal, Phillip 
Sherman, Patricia Stefani, Loretta Borgatti, Bernard Barufaldi 

Classroom Activities — Mary Bradley, Editor 

Judith Green, Suzanne Lekberg, Jacqueline Nunez 

Photography Staff — Carol Melahoures, Editor 
Mary Bradley, Charles Barrett 

Senior Specials — Patricia Brady, Editor 
Theresa Furtado, Don Medara 

School News — Philip Rouvales, Editor 
Janet Balboni, Asst. 

Boys' Sports Editors — Carlton Resnick: Football, Basketball 
Peter Miller: Cross Country 

Girls' Sports Editor — Judith Nunez 

Typists — Barbara Borsari, Elizabeth Lemieux, Dorothy Pacheco, Audrey 
Wood 



Song is the universal language which people the world over under- 
stand. In song, or music, we find the "language of human emotion, the 
expression of the inexpressible." Music has the ability to transform us, 
and to make us strong. We can listen to "The Messiah" and find for 
ourselves the help to the solution of our problems and worldly oppressions. 

The most important part of music is not in the notes; one can follow 
the themes and counter-themes and their elaboration, and one can know 
the score. But that is not enough. It is the power and compulsion of music, 
our response to it, the receiving of a message which everybody under- 
stands, and which anyone can translate for himself, that gives it sig- 
nificance. 

Through the years the tremendous moving force of music has lead 
men to overcome insurmountable barriers. It was the power of song that 
encouraged the Volga boatmen in their arduous task of pulling the great 
barges up and down that mighty river; and the "Allons enfants ..." of the 
French patriot, which heightened incentive in overcoming the tyranny of 
Louis XVI. Even the austere Pilgrims expressed their feelings in hymns 
of thanksgiving and hope, while the Negroes on the plantations sang of 
the coming of Judgment Day and the fall of the walls of Jericho — to 
make life more endurable. 

In all wars from as early as David's conflict with Goliath through 
World War II, Korea, and Indo-China, men have sung to forget and help 
themselves meet the impending challenge of battle. Their spirits have been 
uplifted, and they have gone forth determinedly with the will and fortitude 
to triumph. 

In this twentieth century world in which we are hurtling towards the 
unknown and the unpredictable at breathtaking speed, it is essential that 
there be the song, that indefinable something close to faith, to alleviate 
the problems and tension of our fast-paced life. Melody lifts the spirit, 
leading us on to greater accomplishments, even while it soothes the spirit, 
giving tolerance and understanding. 

One of our greatest centers of the song of today is in the church; it 
makes no difference whether it is the beautiful "Ave Maria" of the Roman 
Catholic, the stirring "Faith of our Fathers" of the Protestant, or the 
inspiring Hebrew "Ali, Ali," all voices are lifted in the reverence of one 
supreme being. In Bruno Walter's words, "Music is like a seraph in the 
temple of the Lord; it covers its eye with two of its wings." 

Always it has been the song that has made a people stand with heads 
high, proudly and fearlessly; when this song is silenced, the people have 
died from within. "The heart's echoes render no song when the spirit is 
mute." 

With A Song In Our Hearts, we hope that we too shall have the faith 
and courage to meet life's problems, individually and as members of 
society, wherever they may arise and whatever they may be. 

CAROL BROOKS FOLEY 

Editor-in-Chief 




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SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 





DOUGLAS BEANE 
President 



DON MEDARA 

Vice-President 





CLAIRE VICTORIA 

Secretary 



HOWARD BENASSI 
Treasurer 




ANN ALBERGHINI 

"Five Foot Two, Eyes Of Blue" 
"Annie" — oh, that blond hair — 
future dental assistant — wants 
to earn a million dollars — 
Marilyn, Fanny, and Joyce — 
hates to get up in the morning — 
secret desire: a certain boy — 
loves steak — Mrs. Urann's Eng- 
lish class — cheers for the boys 
— skating — librarian — Dramatic 
Club — collects 10-cent-a-week — 
whom does she write? — "Not 
too bright for your height!" 



JANIS MAE ANTHONY 

"Sophisticated Lady" 
"Jan" — one of Mr. Pyle's librari- 
ans — Leo — hates to be kept 
waiting — senior class' biggest 
flirt — secret desire: to become 
an expert bowler — hates to fight 
with L. M. — smooth dresser — 
picture her married — likes study 
periods, brown eyes, bracelets — 
seen with Linda and the "Dizzy 
Dames" — favorite hangout: Co- 
lonial Restaurant — Wonder Why? 
— "You're Wacky!" 




EDWARD JOSEPH ALSHEIMER 

"Life Is Just a Bowl of Cherries" 
"Count" — got a date with Uncle 
Sam — "Women, women, and 
more' women !" — really tickles 
those ivories — loves that Mod- 
ern Music and hates the "Square 
Stuff" — a pretzel and - - man — 
the future J. Lovett of the J.C.M. 

— Leo, Horton, and Govoni — 
Silver Lake — "Oh to introduce 
reforms in the schools!" — Celia 

— "The most!" 





MARILYN ARONS 

"Dark Eyes" 

"Dora" — to fly around the world 

— wants to be a Dental Hy- 
gienist — seen working in Reli- 
able Cleaners — loves egg rolls 

— the problem of getting up in 
the morning — Dramatic Club — 
Northeastern fellows — a green 
DeSoto — with Annie, Sally, and 
Marilyn — "Oh, That Intelligent 
Look!" — likes tennis and skating 
— Europe — B.U. boys — red Caddy 
convertible — likes Miss Kelly — 
pork strips — "No, it can't be." 



LEO AMIRO 

"That's Amore" 

Destination: unknown — oh, to 
beat Luisi in the mile — dislikes 
noisy girls — loves to hear those 
"modern sounds" — loves his 
mother's pies — English with Mrs. 
Raymond — slings sodas in the 
Pilgrim Drug — seen with Ed, 
Tom, and Don — track and cross- 
country star — always chewing 
gum — lives on a farm — "Keep 
it cool." 





JUNE ARPONEN 

"Crazy, Man, Crazy" 
"Harpo" — WAFS — hates home- 
lessons and conceited boys — 
Jim's — seen with Patti, Carla, 
Carol, Louise, and Cinny — pizza 
and cranberry sherbet — a hot 
Mercury — Softball — Donnie — 
spaghetti lover — roller skating 
— D'ja ever hear Moon Dog — 
Dimples — has her eye on the 
Lone Star State — pet peeve: 
school in general — Marlon 
Brando, grrrrfff! — "It's the most!" 




BENJAMIN F. ANDERSON 

"Wine, Women, and Song" 
"Bunny" — headed for the Maj 
ines — a basketball fan — lili 
shy girls — has a taste for fif 
scallops — "Plumber," George, 
Jack and Russ — the schl 
commentator on notices- 
Tony's — oh, to sing like Bingl 
"Gotta catch the bus" — "E| 
this guy." 



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GEORGE JOSEPH BARLOW 

"Ol' Man River" 
"Georgie" — an officer in the 
Coast Guard — headed for the 
C. G. Academy — seen blasting 
to Duxbury — hates to get up 
early — a hamburger man — mis- 
ses Miss Wilbur — carrot top — 
with Doug and the boys — a hot 
Ford — math shark — that red 
hair — a pretty smart kid — 
sleeping in physics — two in a 
row — "Be my guest." 



ELEANOR LORRAINE BATES 

"Melody of Love" 
"Elle" — wants to become a sten- 
ographer — dislikes back-seat 
drivers — those Monday morning 
tests — works in a bank — Bobby 

— seen with the gang — good 
basketball and tennis player — 
that long distance between Plym- 
outh and Amherst — likes cats 

— eating pizza and fried clams 

— would like to move to New 
York this summer — "For Pete's 
sakes!" 




CHARLES FRANCIS BARRETT 

"Charlie My Boy" 
"Charlie" — a Celtic fan — down 
with homework — cashier at the 
First National — around school 
with Phil, Bern, and Jerry — he 
wouldn't do a thing like that — 
"Ain't goils wunnerful!" — future 
Math teacher at P.H.S.? — one of 
the 103 study aristocrats — pho- 
tography fanatic — "I don't get 
this stuff at all!" 





JOHN PAUL BATES 

"Small Fry" 

"Slugger" — carpenter on week- 
ends — likes the Wareham girls 

— great cook — seen with Clam, 
Egghead, and Beef — 685th In- 
fantry battalion — headed for the 
Marines — thrives on clams and 
scallops — Tassy's and the White 
Rabbit — would like to sell Mr. 
C. G.'s motors — '41 Plymouth 

— all-star third baseman — great 
drummer — "When are we going 
out, Dill?" 



FRANCIS JOSEPH BARRETT 

"Little Things Mean a Lot" 
"Franny" — a pizza fan — student 
at Hogan's University — with 
Larry, Calona, and Howie — one 
of P. H. S.'s basketball stars — 
just hanging around — likes sports 
— hates homework — works in 
the Laundromat — getting killed 
by Larry — model student — at 
Tassy's — Frec's brother — foul 
shots — "Georgie germ." 





JAMES WILFRED SEAL 

"Crazy Otto" 

"Big Jim" — one of those Car- 
verites — likes a certain girl and 
steak — at Tassy's — with Art, 
Webb, and John B. — picture him 
a millionaire at 39 — that bright 
red hair — a Radio and Auto 
Mechanics man ■ — "C'est la Vie" 
— going to buy Marlon Brando 
a new T - shirt — hitchhiking — 
"Oh, for a job" — "I'm broke!" 





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DOUGLAS ROBERTSON BEANE 

Naughty Marietta" 

oug" — B.U. — our worthy class 

ident — with Rube and Carl 

as an interest in the Nelson 

ily — record collector — odd 

for "Ma" — real collegiate 

big wheel in DeMolay — 

rts fanatic — "Braves" — Honor 

up — "Hall, your Red Sox 

good for nothing." 





HOWARD FRANCIS BENASSI 

"Every Day Is Ladies Day 
with Me" 

"Ben" — headed for college — 
hopes to be a success in life — 
occupation: taking out girls — 
dislikes going steady — loves 
spaghettti — seen with Frankie, 
Vinny, and the boys — our class 
treasurer — Prexy of S. A. S. — 
basketball and track star — likes 
girls in general, Kingston's fav- 
ored — liked A. M. — member of 
the National Honor Society — 
"What are you doing tonight?" 



DONALD F. BOUDREAU 

"Baby Face" 

"Babe" — sells shoes in Walk- 
over's — seen with all the gang 

— drives his '47 Plymouth — at 
Tassy's — coffee frappes and Eng- 
lish muffins — likes bowling and 
girls — the Carver kid — plans to 
join the Air Force with Fedy — 
always fighting in the corridors 

— imagine him a boxer — "You 
lookin' for trouble?" 




LORETTA CLEMENTINE 
BORGATTI 

"Green Eyes" 

"Boggi" — craves apple pie and 
orangeade — seen working in 
Plymouth Hardware — wants to 
become an airline stewardess — 
to spend a week in Japan — a 
private school bus — seen with 
Pris, Pat, Vickie and Aud — one 
of the KK girls — never misses 
a trick — would like to be Gor- 
don McCrae's wife — bank teller 
— Liz Taylor admirer — desper- 
ately trying to knit and cook — 
"I wonder if I got a letter." 





JOYCE ESTHER BOUTIN 

"Street of Dreams" 
"Jo" — she finally came back to 
us — with Fannie, Ann, and 
Marilyn — at "Ernies" — full of 
fun — a Grant's gal — always 
chewing gum — likes dancing — 
who's the Air Force got? — 
survives on pizza — English IV 
— constantly at the movies — 
resident of the elite Clifford 
Road section of town — ■ "I don't 
know." 



BARBARA FRANCES BOSARI 

"Bell-Bottom Trousers" 
'Barb" — desires to hear wedding 
bells — seen out North — potato 
chips and life savers — Joe — 
"How about that!" — Betty, Dot, 
Pat — Hoppy's — hates long assem- 
blies — in a '53 Dodge — girl- 
friend's boyfriend's friend — one 
of Mrs. Whiting's girls — wants 
a radio in study — idolizes Rock 
Hudson — pet peeve: Doris! — 
"What gave you the clue?" 





ALVIN ELLSWORTH BOYER 

"On Wisconsin" 

"Peewee" — headed for the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin — wants to 
be successful in life — got writ- 
er's cramp for Barrett — loves 
southern fried chicken — basket- 
ball star — little fingers and 
Carol — likes to hear Ma and 
Jeff argue — that third period 
study — Ellsworth — his girl — sells 
paint for his father — is he a 
wise guy? — "Look at Barrett's 
head!" 




PAUL BORSARI 

"I'm Tired" 

"Tojo" — likes a Sophomore girl 

— seen with Nick and Danny — 
drives a '48 Ford — football star 

— "Don't call me Tojo!" — one of 
the shot-putters — another pizza 
fiend — works in Benny's — Un- 
cle Mike's boy — a John L. fan 
in Physics — picture him behind 
the bass in a navy band — "Knock 
it off." 



MARY KATHERINE BRADLEY 

"Someday My Prince Will Come" 
"Mary K." — U. of Mass., here 
she comes — wants to get her 
degree — Oh, to be a vet — Press 
Club — loves gooey sundaes — 
Honor Group — A+ in Trig! — 
hankers for a trip to the Virgin 
Islands — horse-back riding — 
— seen with "Mes Amies" — swim- 
ming — her daddy's Packard — 
"Sh-Boom" — "Horrors to be!" 





PATRICIA ANN BRADY 

"A Little Bit Independent" 
"Pat" — Jackson or Pembroke — 
wants to be a bio-chemist — 
Nat'l Honor Society — a real 
hepcat — Dave Brubeck fan — 
digs square dancing — hates 
T. V. commercials — likes sandy 
white beaches — "Ebb Tide" — 
French enthusiast — good dancer 
— seen with "Mes Amies" — "Oh, 
Bernard!" — those trig homeles- 
sons — Science Seminar — "Wait 
'til I'm twenty-one!" 



JEANNE MARY CARON 

"Buttons and Bows" 

"Biscuit" — bound for Truesdale 

Hospital — wants to be a nurse 

— Eddie — she's engaged — "The 
Marines have landed!" — picture 
her with short hair — wishes a 
senior boy would do his own 
French — sings in the Glee Club 

— also heard in the Debating 
Club — seen with Carolyn and 
Danine — Music theory — Oh, that 
302 — Honor Group — "You're a 
sweet kid!" 




JANICE MAE CADORETTE 

"No Other Love" 
"Jan" — Number please girl — 
loves chicken — "Oh, Brother!" 
a certain Junior boy — dislikes 
homework — my little sister — 
Honor Group — one of the KK 
Girls — seen with Claire, Aud, 
Dot, Pat, Pussy and Marilyn — 
remember the party — likes to 
play piano — Bobby ! Bobby ! 
Bobby ! — desires to be Betty 
Grable — loves to talk — "My 
Ford" — Dramatic Club — dislikes 
Transcription — "Wanna Go?" 





AUDREY MARIE CARR 

"Ma Petite" 

"Shorty" — California, here I 
come — wants to join the Waves 
— doesn't like being late — both- 
ered by school — smiles — loves 
roast beef — seen working in F. 
W. Woolworth's — with Mary — 
enjoys field hockey, basketball 
and softball — wants to be a good 
roller skater — so cute! — plays 
piano — she's an aunt — likes Miss 
Kelly — "Melody of Love" — that 
General Clerical — good things 
come in small packages — "Hurry 
up." 



PHILIP MAURO CANEVAZZI 

"You, You, You" 
"Phil" — Tufts Dental — Pilgrim 
Business Manager — likes swim- 
ming and hockey — can't wait 
for study — theater managers irk 
him — "Oh man!" — pipe puffer 

— my license — a Northrup fan 

— trig whiz — "How did you get 
that?" — picture him with a drill 
in his hand, working on Dittmar 

— quiet ? — "Let's clean our 
locker." 





NICHOLAS JAMES CARREIRA 

"Botch-A-Me" 

"Nick" — a Red Sox fan — green 

eyed brunettes — pet peeve: Boyer 

— a spaghetti and tortellini boy 

— life member of Hogan's Uni- 
versity — "Ssst, Sssst, Ssssst" — 
with Weasel, Biz, Tojo, and Liver- 
lips — one of those buck fanatics 
— picture him a clarinet player in 
Goodman's band — one of Miss 
P's favorites — "I get so sick and 
tired!" 




RITA ANN CAPPELLA 

"Bell Bottom Blues" 
"Gabby" — would like to be mar- 
ried by 1960 — secretly wants to 
be a great dancer — Tassy's — 
see the world — hates cats — 
digs popular music the most — 
crazy about Artie! — likes to have 
fun, go swimming — special let- 
ters are received — seen with 
Sonja and the gang — talk, talk, 
talk — wants to go places — jeep 
riding — likes long hair — June! 
— temper! — swoons with "Sin- 
cerely" — "I can't wait!" 



DANIEL CATON 

"Young Man With a Horn" 
"Danny" — works in the A&P — 
always cruising around town — 
seen with Tojo, Biz, and Nick — 
likes tall blonds — big interest 
in Manomet — our great trum- 
peter — would like band every 
period — a Miss Pope fan — pic- 
ture him the leader of a jazz 
band — headed for U. of Mass. 
— "Mo-va-ca!" 





WALTER RUSSELL 
CLEVELAND 

"The Quiet Man" 
"Russ" — a future building con- 
structor — likes roller skating — 
hates, of all things, sharp noises 
— one of those Manomet guys — 
handsome — likes ice cream — 
seen with Verkade, Gage, and 
Bunny — those frequent trips to 
Buzzards Bay — is he really 
quiet? — dreams of dating Mari- 
lyn Monroe — "It's Janice for 
me." 



CONSTANCE MARIE 
DIEGHTON 

"Juke Box Saturday Night" 
"Connie" — can hardly wait to 
graduate — peeved with catty 
girls — arrives at one minute to 
eight — likes roller skating, 
bowling, and parties — her secret 
desire: that's a secret — likes 
G. M.'s famous spaghetti — "Who's 
got a beautiful baby?" — special 
interest in Colonial restaurant — 
friendly — works for her daddy 
— one of the "Dizzy Dames" — 
"Oh, how I hate to get up in 
the morning!" 




JACQUELYN COURTNEY 

"You'll Never Walk Alone" 
"Jackie" — comptometer opera- 
tor — destination: Alaska — cuts 
a mean figure eight on skates — 
Tassy's — she's his gal — hates 
homelessons — would like to eat 
from paper plates — seen with 
Audrey, Agnes, and the "Dizzy 
Dames" — gray Plymouth — Arts 
and Crafts — a tall man — secret 
desire: to be in H. D.'s duffle- 
bag! — "Got a letter!" 





RITA ANNE DIETLIN 

"Pretty Baby" 

"Reedee" — U. of Mass. — future 
medical technician — Sunsetters 
— dancing — Glee Club — secret 
desire to skin dive — "C'est la 
Vie" — Debating Club — Science 
Seminar — seen with the "Mes 
Amies" — dimples — peeved by 
a cross - country star — bothered 
by physics — doll — aspires to be 
the only girl to run the four- 
minute mile — "I never have 
enough time!" 



LULU MAE CURTISS 

"She Wore A Yellow Ribbon" 
"Lollie" — marriage — hoping for 
a successful and happy future — 
a Plymptonian — favorite hang- 
out: Jim's — loves pizza — field 
hockey — pet peeve: gum chew- 
ers and floor walkers — Glee 
Club — seen with Tommy, Joan, 
and Jean — works at Winthrop- 
Atkins — lucky Middleboro — 
secret desire: to be principal of 
P.H.S. for a day — "So, what'll 
we do now?" 





RICHARD ALLEN DIOZZI 
"Unchained Melody" 
"Dizzy" — driving around in an 
M. G. — all his gals — to just 
roam around — possibly a mech- 
anic — remembers Wiesbaden — 
arty — German is his mania — 
survives on Weinershnitzel — his 
secret wish: CENSORED! — real 
deliberate and so slow moving — 
does he work? — "Take me back 
to dear old 'Doitch' land." 




DAVID STANLEY CUSHING 

"Anchors Aweigh" 

"Zeke" — works in Pilgrim Drug 

— 6th period study — golf enthu- 
siast — "Cush" — headed for the 
Navy — likes chemistry experi- 
ments — handles the movie pro- 
jector — Mr. Packard's radio ham 

— great sound effects man — that 
Southern drawl — bachelor — likes 
lobster — another Tassy's patron 

— picture him a big deal Navy 
brass — "Don't know, do you?" 



PAUL DiSALVATORE 

"This Is My Confession" 
Mr. Guidaboni's pet peeve — 
gripes about cafeteria food — sick 
the first day of hunting and 
deer season — picture him the 
King of Italy — around in a '56 
Olds — "I didn't do anything, 
I'm innocent I tell you" — wants 
to see the world — his black 
bomber — class monitor for VI 
period A. M. — escape from Plym- 
outh — works at five and ten — 
Romano's — hoodsies for lunch — 
"You happy, or what?" 





EVERETT CLIFTON DOTEN 

"Do As You Would Be Did By" 
"Dody" — works in Cordage Lab 

— another jazz man — master of 
trombone and bass — a Bruins' 
fan — thrives on Tassy's ham- 
burgers — Miss Downey's right- 
hand S.A.S. man — dislikes dirty 
dishes — with Walt, Al and Jim 

— headed for the service — likes 
jam sessions — 10 years hence: a 
big name in the Stan Kenton 
Band — "Hey, you haven't paid 
up!" 



RICHARD VALENTINO 
FERNANDES 

"Hernando's Hideaway" 
"Dick" — probable future with 
Uncle Sam — flashy smile — Mr. 
Buttner's right hand man — likes 
art — goes for girls especially 
Janice N. — ambitious — two pals 
named John — Mr. B. — always 
replenishing his anatomy with 
morsels — down at the Bowling 
Alley — a cook? — part-time stu- 
dent at Hogan's University — "I 
gotta work." 




THOMAS MERIWEATHER 
DOTEN 

"Cry of the Wild Goose" 
"Jingo" — at Roseland — likes 
hillbilly music — picture him a 
game warden — hates purple 
shirts — bagged a deer — Home 
Arts — hunting with Bub — wants 
to ride his horse to California — 
N. G. corporal — works in trout 
hatchery — debates in Mr. Mul- 
len's — thinks Mr. Nunez would 
look fine wearing a sword and a 
plumed hat — "Go big." 








JOHN TEVES FERREIRA 

"Oh, Johnny" 

"Johnny" — hopes of Babson In- 
stitute — likes Business Econom- 
ics — with Ronny, Dave, and 
Steve — a dream car — at "Teves 
Variety" — craves steak — makes 
excursions to Warren Avenue — 
Nancy ! — a favorite teacher — 
studious — gabbing in the corri- 
dors — a local merchant — most 
efficient — "Get out!" 



PHYLLIS ESTES 
"Foolishly" 

"Phyl" — Green Mountain Jun- 
ior College — basketball — our 
goalie in field hockey — bank 
teller — tennis — record fiend — 
seen with the gang — 10-cent-a- 
week collector — secretary — se- 
cret desire: to work in Rome — 
dislikes mustard, cold weather, 
and not having the car — spag- 
hetti and fried clams — Plymouth 
Savings Bank — foolish Phyls — 
"Seriously, no kidding!" 





CAROL BROOKS FOLEY 

"Chinatown, My Chinatown" 
"C.B." — our Pilgrim Editor-in- 
Chief — to go to Simmons — Honor 
Group — hates risque jokes — 
SA.S. — teasing Dick — longs to 
live in a garret in Paris — "My 
Friends" — that winter carnival 
— Girl's State — pretty Pilgrim — 
"Deep Purple" — music to dream 
by — that black hair and blue 
eyes — MI.T. library next fall — 
"It's My Age." 




CYNTHIA ANN FERGUSON 

"Stardust" 

"Cinny" — to become an airline 
receptionist — wants to own her 
own convertible — oh, to fly to 
Louisiana — dislikes homework 
and kneesocks — another fan of 
Mrs. Urann — poetry, yes — loves 
ravioli — psych's for the birds — 
seen with Carol and Louise — 
found occasionally in the Dairy 
Bar — "I got a letter too!" 



CAROL ANN FORNI 

"When We Come of Age" 
"Bubbles" — "That guy in the 
Air Force!" — Michigan bound — 
a certain fellow, W.M.! — Jim's 

— with Cinny, June and Louise 

— that wavy blond hair — fun — 
dislikes homework — forever 
smiling in spite of it — secretly 
desires to fly to Japan — "Got a 
letter!" — happy-go-lucky — rel- 
ishes turkey — wants to spend 
her life with Wayne — "Terrific!" 





GERALD FURTADO 

•'Mr. Sandman" 

"Lerd" — bound for the service 

— picture him an admiral in the 
Portugese Navy — likes to bowl 

— seen with Zeke and Dave — 
hates to walk — banana splits — 
scholastic genius — spend time at 
Teve's Emporium — likes cars — 
look at his hot Studebaker! — 
rides around with the North 
Plymouth boys — "Cut it out!" 



RONALD RICHARD GOMES 

"A Wonderful Guy" 
"Fedy" — headed for the Air 
Force to become a jet ace — 
likes to eat, sleep and, listen to 
jazz — dislikes girls that go 
steady — another pizza eater — 
seen with Babe, Jon, Porky, and 
Jerry — co-captain of the foot- 
ball team — baseball star — likes 
pretty girls — one of the "Ma" 
fans — wishes all his classes were 
study or gym — "Hi, Doll." 




THERESA MARILYN FURTADO 

"Cherry Pink and 
Apple Blossom White" 
"Terry" — medical secretary to 
a famous doctor — pet peeve: 
one arm drivers — "Number 
Please" — one of the KK girls — 
loves tuna fish and tonic — li- 
brary staff — green armored truck 
— seen on secret missions with 
Cookie — plays piano — would 
like to be Diana Lynn — "Oh 
you know" — Dramatic Club — 
dance committees — "Oh, for 
Pete's sake!" 





PAULA GODDARD 

"My God and I" 
'Polly" — missionary work — des- 
tination Philippines — would like 
to see world-wide peace — quiet 
like a mouse — seen with Carole, 
Marilyn, and Carla — loves to 
read — roller skates — lobster — 
one of Mama Urann's chilluns' — 
thrives on psychology — helps to 
keep the patients happy at Jor- 
dan Hospital — a Plymouth Beach 
hermit — "Oh!" 



JOAN FLORENCE GELLAR 

"Tropical Isle" 

"Jo" — accountant — pet peeve: 

homelessons — why get up early? 

— 6th period study — seen most 
with Wanda and Lulu — admires 
Liz Taylor — works at Gellar's 

— likes short hair — hates to 
come home early on summer 
nights — friendly people — Mano- 
met in the summer — ■ oh, to 
travel to Hawaii! — "Hurry up, 
it's late." 





GERALD ANTON GOODWIN 

"The Happy Wanderer" 
"Gerry" — French whiz — seen 
with Lou, Wis, and Sice — the 
Rocket Oldsmobile — vacations in 
North Plymouth during the win- 
ter — those dented fenders — golf 
pro — the prettiest caddy in the 
state — Sandra — our Junior 
Prom — picture him winning the 
Grand Slam — the most under- 
paid hunter — Ex V. P. — "Yes, 
I'll give you a stick of gum, 
where should I send the bill?" 




EUGENE FRANCIS GILL 

"Whistle While You Work" 
"Gene" — Boston College — pic- 
ture him a millionaire — Don 
Juan in a thunderbird — Lou and 
Nick — wants to be a devil in 
baggy pants — "Hey Lou, lets 
hit New York tonight" — pizza 
and spaghetti — star busboy at 
the Hotel Mayflower — coupe — 
those crazy glasses — picture him 
driving a Lincoln in the Pan 
American race — "Mr. Pyle, she'll 
do 90 in first, 115 in second and 
..." — "I'm proud of you." 



GEORGE WILBUR GOVONI 

"My Time Is Your Time" 
"Sonny" — Air Force — in Jim's 
Restaurant — picture him a pizza 
— deer hunter — drives a hot 
fish truck after school — In Ro- 
mano's — another Valentino ? — 
loves that Italian food — likes 
midget wrestling ■ — looking for 
the funny side of life — "How 
about that?" 





JUDITH LINDA GREEN 

• On Wings Of Song" 
"Judy" — destined for Lake Erie 
College — wants to see the world 
— sings in the Glee Club — 
that musicianship class — future 
teacher — seen with Carol, Lois, 
Jean and Marilyn — dislikes prej- 
udiced people — her little black 
cat — secretly desires to be a re- 
cording star — cute earrings — 
thoroughly excitable — "Wait 'til 
I get to college; then things will 
be different!" 



KENNETH STEWART HALL 

"Halls of Ivy" 

"Kenny" — bound for the U.S.N. 

— a Celtic fan — arguing with 
Gary — hates the St. Louis Cards 

— "Censored!" — temperamental 
tennis player — "Eight ball in the 
side pocket" — either at the fire 
house or Steng's — a left guard 
in basketball— P.H.S.' Bob Feller 

— homework on a pool table — 
"I still say the Bruins are ter- 
rible." 




STUART ALBERT GULHANG 

"Perpetual Motion" 
"Stu" — likes girls and hamburg- 
ers — wants an Olds — at Le- 
land's — best subject is study — 
would like to give Plymouth 
back to the Indians — record 
lover — Cecelia!! — that sign lan- 
guage — another sports fanatic — 
quiet — popular — wants to get 
married — with the fellas. 



FANND2 SEYMOUR HADAWAY 

"Fanny" 

"Fan" — won't reveal her middle 

name! — wants to make money 

— peeved over arguing — dislikes 
Monday nights — prefers movies 
and skating — secret desire: R.A.S. 

— basketball — field hockey — one 
of Mrs. Whiting's girls — seen in 
a green convertible — oh, that 
red hair — a Chiltonville gal — 
who's Dick? — she and Joyce — 
to work in a bank — a wife 
someday — "I don't know!" 







MARY CAROL HARNEY 

"When Irish Eyes Are Smiling" 
"Happy" — Pilgrim Art Editor — 
visions of Mass. Art — "M. A." 
Treasurer — that French pronun- 
ciation — Sunsetters — wants to 
live in Greenwich Village — those 
notes to Carol — spiffs with Pat 
— haunts the Saquish — talk, 
talk, talk! — Oh, those corny 
jokes — talented — Woolworth's 
most valuable worker — likes 
square dancing — hails from Nel- 
son Street — "I'se got my eyes 
on you." 



MARCIA KATHARINE HASZ 

"I Believe" 

"Mushy, the Milkmaid" — one of 
the two P.K.'s — she's off to Con- 
cordia — secretly desires to fly a 
jet — sauerkraut and onions — her 
drosophila — science whiz kid — 
dreams away on Bach's music 

— admires C. B. F.'s ability to 
write poetry — ardent square - 
dancer — with "Mes Amies" — to 
speak French like a Parisienne 

— "Are you listening, Mr. Y.?" 




MYRNA MELISSA HADAWAY 

"Annie, Get Your Gun" 
"Minnie" — headed for the Waves 

— wants to act like a lady of her 
age — dislikes argumentative peo- 
ple — likes tuna fish — another of 
Miss Knight's star pupils — pas- 
ses her summers in the Brown 
Bear — a three-sport star — seen 
with the Manomet gang — D.C.H. 

— one of the seniors in French I 

— recess with a certain sopho- 
more — "Why?" 



PAULINE CLAIRE HEATH 

"Tennessee Wig-walk" 
"Salty" — she and Jan — oh, that 
letter from "Sanna Baby" — dis- 
likes shorthand — thrives on Ital- 
ian food — picture her as Galdie 
Hill — pays Tassy's help with 
juke box nickels for hillbilly 
records — a Murray St. resident 

— what's in Wheeling, W. Va? — 
one of Mama Urann's chilluns' 

— pet peeve: "Burch" — oh, that 
pony tail! — living in them thar 
hills — "I hate people." 





CAROLYN RUTH HOLMES 

"C'est Magnifique" 

"Holmsie" — to become a nurse 

— headed for Hawaii — dislikes 
homelessons and poor sports — 
seen with Carol M. — another 
pizza eater — one of Miss 
Knight's hoopsters — field hockey 
fan — Johnny — favorite class: 
physical education — driver train- 
ing whiz — .300 hitter in Softball 

— "That ought to learn ya!" 



MARILYN ELAINE KIVI 

"My Friend" 

"Maija" — travel — loves pizza 
and Pepsi — like's getting Dad's 
car — picture her married — 
Craft Class — seen with Carole, 
Carla, and Paula — lives in White 
Island woods — Girard! — roller 
skating — wants a mink coat — 
really wants to do good — loves 
bookkeeping II — Western Songs 
— "Minky" — Sunsetters — "How 
about that." 




EDWIN LAWRENCE JOKINEN 

"Money, Money, Money" 
"Eddie" — his Old's isn't good 
enough — wants a jet — Edaville 

— Milwaukee fan, down with the 
Red Sox — chicken dinners — 
wants a souped '55 Bel Air — 
rhythm and blues — quiet type 

— wants a class in bed testing — 
oh, that blond hair. 





JAMES RONALD 
KRITZMACHER 

"Here In My Heart" 
"Kritz" — test tube washer — Sylvia 
— works in Cordage Lab — drives 
'51 Nash — thrives on steak — 
likes Miss Kelly — Mr. Romano's 
head dime collector — dislikes 
11:23 assemblies — seen with Larry 
— plays in band — his little 
cousin Carol — will soon be 
climbing telephone poles — loung- 
ing around study hall — "I don't 
believe it!" 






MARJORIE ANN KINGMAN 

"Song of the Barefoot Contessa" 
"Marjie" — seen working in Mc- 
Lellan's wants to have her own 
home — loves pizza — seen with 
Sue — dislikes homelessons — 
would like to have her own 
driver training car — pet peeve: 
Susie — wants to travel — dislikes 
problems — one of Carver's 
Belles — seen but not heard — 
loves to dance — goes steady — 
JCW the Illrd — "Oh, Gosh." 





HAROLD JOHN LAMMINMAKI 

"Semper Fidelis" 
"Clam" — off to the Marines — 
likes swimming and hunting 
(for four legged deer) and fish- 
ing — girls, girls, and more girls 
— making plans to abolish school 
in the 91st Congress — just loves 
to eat — spaghetti and meat ball 
man — life member of Jim's 
Restaurant — "We'll have a ball!" 




ELLA MAE KINGSLEY 

"I Love Paris" 

"El" — telephone operator — Air 
Force — seen with Ann, Becky, 
and Marilyn — hates homework 

— quiet, shhhh! — picture her 
with straight hair — art — Is that 
curl natural ? — would change 
places with Janet Leigh — pizza 

— a Woolworth girl — pet peeve: 
brother — Paris, here she comes! 

— "What I mean!" 



ELIZABETH ANNE LEMIEUX 

"More Than You Know" 
"Betty Ann" — married life — a 
'47 Pontiac — wants to be a legal 
secretary — crack typift — Mrs. 
Whiting's helper — hockey — pic- 
ture her with 10 kids — craves 
chocolate cake — bowling — Nat- 
ional Honor Society and Honor 
Group — "Jose's" — seen with 
Barb and Dot — Billy — ticket 
seller — would like to take short- 
hand at 150 words a minute — 
"Oh, no." — "How about that." 





ANNE HOPE LeSHANA 

"Song of India" 

"Annie" — career in the skies — 
Air-line hostess — life with Ray 
— seen with the gang — Glee 
Club — Pilgrim Drug — assistant 
field hockey manager — loved In- 
dian food — pet peeve: two pesty 
boys in 303; W.M. and R.K. — 
hates the distance between Plym- 
outh and New Hampshire — secret 
desire: to go back to India — 
"No riot!" — "You know I do!" 



CAROL JANE MAROIS 

"Tenderly" 

One of the gang — wants to travel 

— collects 10-cent-a-week — oh, 
to be a secretary — let's abolish 
homework — wishes the post- 
man would hurry — chicken, yum! 

— "Jiminy Cricket" — that jun- 
ior year, a certain senior — pet 
peeve: people who are always 
late — likes Steno. II? — lives in 
Stumptown — Daddy's helper — 
she and J.D. — Auntie Carol — 
"Hey" — "Oh, Golly!" 




NANCY LOUISE MAFFINI 

"Say You'll Wait For Me" 
"Muffy" — one of the gang — a 
Harvard man — legal secretary 
— peeved when driving around 
rotaries — dislikes the distance 
between Cambridge and Plym- 
outh — gooey sundaes — oh, to 
get a hundred in a Psych, test — 
likes hen parties — S. A. S. — 
"Jack called!" — likes her Grand- 
ma's cooking — cheers for the 
boys — "Oh, those brothers of 
mine!" — "No, really." 





RALPH LEONARD MATINZI 

"Beg Your Pardon" 
"Ralphie" — headed for college 
and a teaching career — dislikes 
extra long homelessons — mem- 
ber of the Junior Classical 
League — reports for the Press 
Club — another pizza fan — likes 
all his teachers — Latin whiz — 
does he really like to study? — 
one of three — "Curiosity killed 
the cat; information brought it 
back." 






MARGARET JOANNE MAKI 

"From Nine to Five" 
"Micky" — business school — wants 
to travel — pet peeve: brother — 
to be a secretary and marry the 
boss — dislikes sixth period study 
— seen with Shirley, Sonja, Carol, 
and Rita — umm! that light blue 
'55 convertible — dislikes hard- 
hearted men — would change 
places with Debbie Reynolds — 
secret desire: to see cotton 
candy on Coney Island — "I don't 
know." 





RITA EMILY MATINZI 

"Sisters" 
"Sis" — wants to be a clerk — 
one of the famous three — wants 
to see the world — "Can I have 
the car?" — fun to be with — car- 
nation maker — dislikes loud 
boys — one of the KK girls — 
seen working in McClellan's — 
WORL — Press Club — Roberta 
— wants to get married — Glee 
Club — likes to read — would like 
to be manager of a department 
store — "Oh, my brother!" 







SONJA MAKI 

"I Would Be True" 
"Son" — wants to get rich — des- 
tination: Who knows ? — her 
little sister — eats chicken and 
rice, Spanish style — likes H.A. 
with Mrs. Kingman — she's a 
Carver telephone operator — seen 
with Rita and Mickey — Owen 
— she's got a license now — lend- 
ing Kleenex to Carol — always 
smiling — likes to eat before re- 
cess — "Number please." 



ROBERTA ETHEL MATINZI 

"Never Such Devoted Sisters" 
"Bobby" — seen with Rita and 
KK's — Mrs. Gardner's General 
Clerical class — Liberace's priv- 
ate hairdresser — hates long hair 
— lives in the North Plymouth 
Fire Station — dislikes loud colors 
— one of our bank tellers — to 
be Peggy King — saved our Jr. 
Prom with her carnations — 
sisterly love? — member of the 
Glee Club — "Who you knit'n 
for?" 





WALTER JOSEPH McCANN 

"Smarty-Pants" 

"Buck" — Newton's loss was our 
gain — loves progressive jazz — 
rather intelligent — basketball 
star — grey bucks — off to Har- 
vard — another "Ma" fan — those 
plaid vests — pizza fan — THE 
red - hat boy — slick dresser — 
Honor Group — all-round guy — 
would like to own an orchard of 
money trees — picture " Mac " 
selling Buicks (or perhaps 
Pontiacs) — "Hi." 



PETER SPRINGER MILLER 

"If You Knew Susie" 

"Pete" — those K.K. commercials 

— whiffle and white bucks — a 
whiz at math — our track star — 
God's gift to Plympton — another 
red-hatter — likes boogie piano 

— our T.V. star — may consider 
Harvard — N R O T C boy — likes 
soph, girls — would like an all 
boy senior math class — picture 
him the only boy cheerleader at 
P.H.S. — 'Simply sterling." 




PATRICIA McGRATH 

"Sentimental Me" 

"Pat" — ambition: to get married 

— likes to go to North Caro- 
lina — another study hall lover 

— pet peeve: lunch line — one 
of Mrs. Kingman's cooks — dis- 
likes English — hobby: boys? — 
seen with Phye and Lovey — good 
things come in small packages — 
who's the locker Cassanova that 
admires her? — longs to be Deb- 
bie Reynolds — a Glee Club 
warbler — "So there you are!" 





CLAIRE ANN MITCHELL 

"An Apple For The Teacher" 
Bridgewater bound — one of the 
gang — liked French and Miss 
Jacques — "You got the car?" — 
chemistry and — "What are you 
wearing?" — basketball and ten- 
nis — cute chick — likes dramatics 

— soda jerk — picture her a nurs- 
ery teacher — makes good pizza 

— "Who's going?" 



DON MEDARA 

"Little Brown Jug" 

"Portugee" — headed for college 

— wants to become a pilot — 
spends much time in "Stang's" 

— dislikes witches but likes girls 
in general — likes to sleep in 
physics — seen with Caton and 
Hall — Vice - President of our 
class — track and cross-country 
star — likes to keep score for 
P.H.S. basketball games — four 
letter man — a certain blond. 





RONALD FRANCIS MORAN 

"My Gal Sal" 

"Ronnie" — in Jim's Restaurant 
with Paul, Tas and Hatchet — 
another Marlon Brando — am- 
ateur wood-worker — building a 
guillotine for Mr. G. — N-N-N- 
Nuney — Sally — wants a '53 
Merc. Convertible — honorary 
Carver boy — good cartoonist, his 
masterpiece, the "Hatchet" on 
one canvas. 




CAROL ANN MELAHOURES 

"If I Had A Talking Picture 
Of You" 
Headed for Vermont — wants to 
travel — hates making that 8:00 
bell — dislikes homework — a 
person who eats anything — likes 
gym — another Urann fan — seen 
with Holmsie — a dead-eye in 
basketball — tennis and hockey 
star — her mother's her guide — 
the quiet type — driver training 
whiz — "Real jazzy!" 



LEO ANDREW MORIN 

"We're Coming, Leo" 
"Hatchet" — headed for Bonne- 
ville Race Track to be a car 
jockey — fishing fanatic — that 
Ford '49 with duals — abolish 
school — hates English; too much 
work — loves Home Arts; plenty 
to eat — Scratch, Clam, and Von 
— "Oh to own a fast custom 
car!" — "You happy or what?" 





JOANNE MOSHER 

"Smile" 

"Jo" — wants to own a yellow 
Ford convertible — marriage — 
likes to talk on the telephone 

— would like to meet Robert 
Wagner — seen with Norma, 
Polly, Jan and Mol — loves BLT's 

— R & B records — dislikes liv- 
ing in Carver and typing — that 
'49 Chevie — would like to be 
Kim Novak — a one man gal — 
Joanna Banana — George — "Let's 
Go" — "I can't remember" — "I 
forgot." 



DOROTHY ANN PACHECO 

"No Other Love" 
"Dot" — Fisher Junior College — 
wants to have natural curly hair 
— seen working in Smith's — 
likes Mr. Richard S. — one of the 
K K girls — Vinnie — a North 
Plymouth Gal — Hoppy's — Daddy's 
DeSoto — loves chocolate cake — 
Mrs Whiting's helper — Betty, 
Claire and Barb — 10-cent - a - 
week collector — would like tc 
be Janet Leigh — ticket seller — 
"Who's got the car tonight?" — 
"Al-righty." 




RODMAN ELLIS NICKERSON 

"Goin' Fishin' " 

"Skippy" — future date with 
Uncle Sam — ambition is to make 
money — *39 Ford — "Wimmin" — 
pet peeve: game wardens — with 
Gerry, Joe, Dill, Inky, and "Old 
Betsey" — those rich lobster fish- 
ermen — eats venison — likes 
track — secretely desires to run 
a four minute mile — one of the 
Chiltonville boys — he, his dog. 
and his gun — grid star — fre- 
quents the trout hatchery — "By 
Cracky!" 





RONALD WINDSOR 
PATTERSON 

"California, Here I Come" 
"Pat" — destination: Air Force 

— seen in Lippys — bound for 
California — hunting in the Car- 
ver woods — hates neckties and 
rolled down shirt sleeves — 
foreman of 6th period shop 

— arguing with Paul — ham- 
burger and steak man — Bev — 
picture him breaking the sound 
barrier in a jet-propelled Merc. 

— real sharp dresser — "You bet- 
ter believe that." 



JUDITH ANN NUNEZ 

"Lady of Spain" 
"Judy" — headed for college — 
wants to be a medical technol- 
ogist — dislikes fast drivers? — 
loves sliced chicken sandwiches 
— seen with Ernie, Jean, and 
Maggie — S.A.S. — hockey star — 
Jimmy — terrific personality — 
Manomet sprout — a whiz at 
scholastic exams — good all-around 
girl — does she see clearly? — 
"Why is Mississippi so far from 
Manomet?" 





LAWRENCE JAMES PAUL 

"Wish You Were Here" 

"Larry" — Air Force, here he 
comes — PHS' great ail-American 
— J.P. — unusual interest in used 
cars — pizza fan — would like to 
abolish all homework — basket- 
ball star — a loafer? — with Ca- 
lona, Ben and Franny — quiet 
type — most athletic! — what a 
voice! — Come on, Larry, put it 
through — "Better believe it!" 




RICHARD RONALD O'KEEFE 

"How Important Can It Be" 
"Scratch" — bound for the ser- 
vice — wants to be president of 
Portugal — travels to Boston with 
Perk — dislikes teachers and 
school in general — another pizza 
eater — likes Mrs. Kingman — 
seen with Perk, Clam, Von, 
Hatch and Biz — that free food 
in H.A. — works in the nickle 
and dime — likes study periods 
— "Belt a smelt." 



JONATHAN AUSTIN PERKINS 

"Hold My Hand" 

"Perk" — a living doll — hunting 
and pool enthusiast — drives his 
"Bel-Air" — with O'Keefe, Fedy 
and Reggiani — in the workshop 

— football star — headed for bus- 
iness school — hails from Carver 

— picture "Perk" a hero, in the 
Rose Bowl — plays baseball — 
"Do your English Claire?" — "No 
money" — "What do you say?" 





DONALD FRANCIS PERRAULT 

"The Skater's Waltz" 
"Don" — a craving for fried 
clams — one of those amateur 
hockey players — Lois — at Tassy's 

— his '41 Merc — to the Air 
Force — oh, to be a ham (radio 
that is) — hates getting up on 
cold mornings — with Leo, Skip, 
and Dill — to run a 3 minute 
mile in 2 minutes — pond — girls 

— "Oh, ya!" 



DIANE ESTHER POTTER 

"Roses for Remembrance" 
"Danny" — Rittner's School of 
Florists — seen with Jeanne — 
loves music — always smiling — 
secret desire: to be the first 
woman mayor of Carver — just 
a woods-bunny — "Do you have 
an Aspirin?" — oh, to see the 
world — Glee Club — Dramatic 
Club — our six-footer — flower 
committee — "Did you do your 
problems?" 




CAROLE ADA PETOCCHI 

"Wedding Bells" 
"Joe" — wedding bells in Aug- 
ust — secret desire: to become a 
writer — always on a diet — 
talk, talk, talk! — Marilyn, Ella, 
Carla, Dot and Al — Smith's — 
would like to be principal of 
P.H.S. — dance committees — Al's 
better half — librarian — future 
Kingstonite — Dramatic Club — 
four boys of her own — Oh, that 
multifacet sparkle! — "Gee, what 
a grouch!" 





PHYLLIS BARBARA PROCTOR 

"As Time Goes By" 
"Phyl" — destination: photog- 
rapher — loves to travel — does 
not like pessimists — detests 
being called quiet — collecting 
records — fried chicken — Mrs. 
Raymond and English — likes 
Problems of Democracy ? — 
what's Indiana got that Plym- 
outh hasn't? — seen with Pat and 
Jan — like to be Mamie — dreams 
of show business — creative abil- 
ity — "Gee!" 



THOMAS HENRY PICKLES 

"Wild Horses" 

"Dill" — headed for the Air Force 

— wants to be a State Trooper — 
bowling — dislikes girls? — likes 
radio with Mr. Packard — digs 
that hot Italian food — works in 
Cooper's Drug Store — with Leo, 
Skip, Steve, Doug, and Babe — 
X-country star (that last race) 

— a Urann fan — runs the 440 — 

M.M. — " , but don't break 

it." 





LEONARD JOSEPH REGGIANI 

"Crazy Rhythm" 
"Lenny" — loathes that old mo- 
tor — likes scallops and French 
fries — bakes bread and rolls 
dough — what happened to the 
regular scope screens at the 
movies? — think he'll ever get 
that date with Theresa Brewer? 
— Out to Hoppy's — picture him 
taking Gene Krupa's place at the 
drums — hates Fords, but oh 
those Chevies — "Hey!" 




MARY LOUISE PO 

"Sweet and Lovely" 
"Cookie" — wants to be a fashion 
designer — coffee frappes — to 
have a home for stray animals — 
S. A. S. representative — certain 
Bruins' fan — bowling — her big 
brothers — M-m-m that night at 
Hugo's — archery — wants to go 
to Canada — "Poor Red Sox" — 
likes to play the piano — Sun- 
day night movies — press club — 
"Boy, what I've got to tell you" 
— "Oh, tremendous." 



CARLTON RONALD RESNICK 

"Mr. Touchdown" 
"Carl" — Cornell bound — foot- 
ball star — vanilla frappes — 
Fresh and Soph girls — record 
fan — farm hand — lady killer — 
lost money on football games — 
intramural star — dynamic per- 
sonality — baby blue eyes — wary 
of rafts — puts the shot for track 
team — debater — S. A. S. rep. — 
plays violin and accordion for 
Mile. Jacques — "If I can get the 
car" — "S'il vous plait." 












fL* 






^i 




ja 








i ■«* 



CARLA ANN ROBBINS 

"Earth Angel" 

"Carla" — who's that certain Mar- 
ine? — seen with Marilyn, Carole 
and June — Mrs. Kingman and 
Home Arts — picture her a WAF 

— pet pain: nine year old sister 

— dreams of a luscious red con- 
vertible — fried clams morning, 
noon, and night — roller skating 
and hillbilly music — oh, those 
6:00 a.m. blues — World History? 

— a "Cedarvillian" — always seen 
writing letters — "He's my 
honey!" 



JAMES RICHARD RUFFINI 

"You've Got to be a 
Football Hero" 

"Jim" — study history at Bridge- 
water State — all hail Notre Dame 

— likes to see Ma walking the 
dog — "I don't like people with- 
out a sense of humor!" — pro- 
gressive jazz fan — spaghetti too 

— Tadgell and Dody — member 
of Hogan's U. — P.H.S.'s 205 lb. 
tackle — that college Math!" — 
"Oh to have Mr. Pyle in my 
history class!" — "hey McCann." 




DORA-LEE ROULSTON 

"How Important Can It Be?" 
"Doe" — headed for Green Mt. 
Jr. College — secretly yearns for 
a house like Gino's — some silly 
senior boys — one of the gang — 
National Honor Society — peeved 
when the hyphen is left out of 
her name — tortellini muncher — 
likes cheering for the boys — 
sports enthusiast — bank teller — 
Best Girl Citizen — "Ma, can I 
have the car?" — "Oh, bananas." 





PETER RICHARD SAISA 

"Music, Music, Music" 
"Pete" — hidden desire: to have 
Mr. G. for a pupil — a certain 
blonde soph — picture him an 
all-American — hates to be bored 
— Jokey, Robey and Bruce — 
"Oh Buddha, them jokes" — Red 
Sox and Celts — Jane — intra- 
murals star — Carver jets — the 
losing battle against his Ford — 
Stanghellini's — Ohio State — 
"What'll we do!" 



PHILLIP LEE ROTTVALES 

"Long Distance Love" 
"Phil" — headed for S.M.U. — in 
Cooper's with Berny, Charlie, 
and John — coffee and toast — 
way up in the sticks — trips to 
Boston — around with Mary K. — 
a real square dancer — would 
like to take a trip to Turkey — 
waitin' for the bus — down at the 
library — "I don't know." 





PATRICIA ANN SANTARPIA 

"Patti" — marriage — wants to be 
a hairdresser — working at Ellis 
Haven — a light blue convert- 
able — can't wait to get out 
of school — Home Arts — wants 
to be with Cliff — one of the 
Carver belles — Mrs. Kingman — 
fun to be with — to see the 
world — "How about that" — "Oh 
very well then." 




JAMES ERNEST ROY 

"Just One Of Those Things" 
"Big Ern" — that noise, is it an 
H-bomb? an earthquake? no, just 
Ernie's idea of a good muffler — 
Chem whiz — professors — Ford's 
next chief designer — wizard of 
104 — hunting and fishing — '41 
Plymouth — Von, Hatch, and Wil- 
bur — "Aabdzzh." 



WINSOR THOMAS SAVERY 

"Make Yourself Comfortable" 
"Win" — the Merchant Marines 
— football fanatic — history teach- 
ers — with Gene — he's been 
working on the railroad (Eda- 
ville) — likes Caddy's and Jag's 
— a Naval reserve boy — oh to 
be president of that 1:60 club — 
Rita Hayworth fan; not M.M. — 
hated Latin; especially Cicero — 
going to get a soapbox from 
Mr. Guidaboni — "O.K." 





AUDREY SCAGLIARIM 

"The Naughty Lady of 
Shady Lane" 

"Scag" — to be a private secre- 
tary for J.D. — "Oh, to own my 
own air mail stamp machine" — 
dislikes cars that keep stalling 
— always waiting for the mail 
man — a certain guy in the Air 
Force — seen with Jackie, Cin, 
and the Dizzy Dames — works 
in Buttner's — likes bookkeeping 
and typing — one of Mr. Pyle's 
librarians — "You're wacky!" 



GARY ALLEN SMITH 

"Warsaw Concerto" 
"Smitty" — seen with "Cooky" — 
love those blue eyes — with Al 
and the boys — keeps Lelands in 
business — thrives on coffee 
frappes — one of Miss Downey's 
S A.S. boys — argues with Kenny 
about the Bruins — headed for 
B.U. School of Public Relations 
— picture him playing first base 
for the Card's — "Savery's Lane, 
Here I come!" 




ELLIOTT GERALD SEGAL 

"A Slow Boat to China" 
"El" — Tufts here he comes — 
piano player — idolizes Art Ta- 
tum — sells shoes to young girls 
in Dexter's — she's a freshman 

— with Carl, Rube, and Phil — 
KK commercials — likes jazz 
(piano) — future ambassador to 
Russia — gets lost on cross coun- 
try courses — doctor in 15 years 

— big brown eyes — and chemis- 
try — authority on communism 

— "Who stole my French book?" 





PRISCILLA ANNE SMITH 

"A Little Bit of Heaven" 
"Puss" — Business School — a good 
skater — her "Study" — wants to 
be a secretary — one of the KK 
girls — likes to play the piano — 
a North Plymouth gal — a Deb- 
bie Reynolds fan — office assist- 
ant — seen with Pat, Boggie, 
Vickie, and Aud — dramatic club 
— dislikes five passenger cars — 
sweet smile — likes psychology — 
Bookkeeping II — "Honestly." 



PHILLIP NELSON SHERMAN 

"Goofus" 

"Phil" — soda jerk in Cooper's — 
model airplane fiend — those 
corny jokes — future doctor — 
Kingston! Where's Kingston? — 
headed for Tufts — 6th period 
study — seen with El, Carl, and 
Charlie — bachelor? — "Oh to be 
like Don Eliot" — Spike Jones 
and Jackie Gleason fan — picture 
him with a pipe — always sick! 
— "Hey, Rube." 





EUGENE JOHN SPINOLA 

"Davy Crockett" 
"Spinny" — a Conn, college — 
accountant — Rosalie — East Car- 
ver — likes girls, but those per- 
sistent ones! — those Carver hills 

— dig Rhythm and Blues — Jag 

— would like to be President of 
the U. S. — pet peeve: a certain 
junior girl from Carver — smoth- 
ered desire: to be a great singer 
"All righty, old sweetie!" 




CYNTHIA SIMMONS 

"Sweet Sue" 

"Sue" — wants to build a super 
highway between Carver and 
Holbrook — dislikes pink shirts 
and snow — likes to eat pizza and 
cherry ice cream — English classes 

— seen with Audrey and Marge 

— last year's chem brain — al- 
ways smiling — Bob — fond of 
Miss Locklin — terrific personal- 
ality — "Fights" with Phil — "How 
about that!" 



JOHN LAWRENCE STAPLES 

"The Kid's Last Fight" 
"Jack" — seen in Churchill's Gas 
Station — with Bunty and Joe — 
model airplanes — "Staples will 
you please clear those girls away 
from your desk and start study- 
ing" — likes to sleep late — juicy 
steaks — star guard for P.H.S. — 
big Buicks — all- American guard 
at B. U. — sleeping in class — 
"What's new?" 





PATRICIA LYNNE STEFANI 

"Beautiful, Beautiful 
Brown Eyes" 

"Patty" — nursing — S.A.S. secre- 
tary — dramatic club — dance 
committees — pizza and apple pie 

— dislikes homelessons — argyle 
knee socks — seen with Boggie, 
Terry, Aud, Vickie, and Pus — 
Jerry Lewis' pal — number please 
girl — that naturally curly hair 

— co-chairman of Junior Red 
Cross — secret desire: to give E. 
J. a kiss — "Oh, kill it." 



DANIEL FREDERICK TONG 

"That Old Black Magic" 
"Dan" — works in Alden Jew- 
elry — seen with Mary Phyllis — 
oh! that red, wavy hair — plays 
trombone in band — likes psy- 
chology — headed for the Navy 
— smart dresser — dislikes vocab. 
tests — thrives on spaghetti — a 
great magician — would like to 
outdo Fu-Ling — picture "Dia- 
mond" Dan's name in lights. 




ALFRED TADGELL 

"Over the Rainbow" 

"Al" — seen with Walt and Jim 

— the quiet type? — works in 
Bradley's — sax player — the blue- 
eyed blond — Northeastern bound 

— a loyal Braves fan — dislikes 
popular music — thrives on jazz 

— all food except fish — a Le- 
land's patron — picture him a 
successful business man — "Hey 
Dad! what's the scene?" 





DAVID VAUGHN TORRANCE 

"Sh-Boom" 

"Von" — seen blasting to White 
Island Pond — the moondoggers 
— writing for Mr. Nunez — pic- 
ture him a record breaker at 
Bonneville — good mechanic — ob- 
served streaking to Manomet — 
hidden desire: to be a movie 
star — hot '49 Ford — good dres- 
ser — a certain brunette — Town 
Brook Service Station — "Man 
you're nowhere." 



CHARLES DANIEL TASSINARI 

"Here" 

"Turtle" — with Judy — North 
Plymouth alleys — likes auto 
mechanics — Franny, Larry, 
Benass and Zaniboni — a future 
accountant — baseball, basketball 
and football — picture him a star 
like Franny — "Best All Round" 
— one of Coach Mullen's and 
Roger's boys — gunner Tassinari 
— those John L. eyebrows — likes 
English? — "Can I go to the gym?" 





CLAIRE MARIE VICTORIA 

"Who Stole My Heart Away?" 
"Vickie" — Salem State — hopes 
to join the future ranks of teach- 
ers — our little class secretary — 
office assistant — "Unforgettable" 
seen with the KK's — Dot's pet 
peeve! — scrap books — specializes 
in moods — St. Mary's Junior 
Organist — blue songs — Perry 
Como fan — ballet for me — butch- 
er's daughter — desires a 90 bowl- 
ing — June 19 — key tickler — 
— "You'll be sorry." 




■ .^ 



\i 



VINCENT PAUL TASSINARI, Jr. 

"Stolen Moments" 
"Vinny" — Navy — seen in North 
Plymouth — picture him as an 
admiral of the fleet — a pretty 
junior — debates with Holmsie 
on the way to Brockton U.S.N.R. 

— likes most: brother's hot Ford 

— dislikes most: brother using 
hot Ford — wants to steal Plym- 
outh Rock — attack the first Fort 

— L. A. Rams — Paul, Ronnie, 
and Hatchet — Radio ham — 
hunter — wants to be a hermit. 



MARIE ANN VIELLA 

"Oh Marie" 

"Chicken" — Hawaii — slaves at 
Martha's Gift Shop — seen most 
with Mary and Lyn — Bridge- 
water State Teacher's College — 
to be a world traveler — pizza 
and Elmer's — detests going to 
bed early — Mrs. Whiting's helper 
— fly to Mars — seen roller skat- 
ing down the Bay — Boys be- 
tween 19 - 21 wow! — "Oh well, 
that's life!" 





JANICE MAE WALL 

"Celery Stalks At Midnight" 
"Jan" — destination: marriage — 
to be a lady wrestler — digs 
Rock 'n Roll music — Billy — 
'48 Plymouth — Polly — her bet- 
ter half — loves fried chicken — 
dislikes male drivers — Mr. Mul- 
len and his problems — that long, 
long hair — would make a good 
member of Mr. Pyle's 1:60 club 
— always talking — chewing gum. 



MARGARET ROSE WHALEN 

"I Never See Maggie Alone" 
"Maggie" — bound for nursing 
school — wants to nurse handi- 
capped children — dislikes crazy 
drivers — eating fried clams — 
Bobby — hockey and basketball 
star — likes French with Miss 
Jacques — works in the Dairy 
Maid — Ernie, Jean, and Judy — 
tremendous personality — riding 
back and forth from Manomet — 
those P.J. parties with the kids. 




BARBARA ANNE WARNSMAN 

"Dance, Ballerina, Dance" 
"Barbi" — marriage — would like 
to be a bank teller — co-captain 
of cheerleaders — pet peeve: 
homework — Ronnie! — seen with 
the gang — Honor Society — class 
colors committee — "Let's go!" — 
"Hurry up!" — Currier's — yearns 
to be as thin as Nancy — best 
girl dancer of our senior class 
— lovely smile — "Gee whiz!" 





SHIRLEY ANN WILLIAMS 

"Alexander's Ragtime Band" 
"Shirl" — a future teacher — keep- 
ing Mr. Nunez after school — boys 
— hates to be told what to do — 
likes Edaville; wonder why — 
hails from South Carver — pic- 
ture her as Claire's sister — lob- 
ster and chicken at the Hobo- 
mock — could spend six periods 
of? — does she get people into 
trouble? — a real sport — Mr. Pa- 
checo's star trumpeter — seen 
with Mickey and the gang — 
"For gosh sakes!" 



DAVID WATSON 

"Green Years" 

"Dave" — seen at Mel's — picture 
him throwing knives at Mr. N. 
in the big top — Dunkin' Donuts 
— "I s,mell smoke in the base- 
ment" — hot '36 Olds — at Jim's 
hasn't done a homelesson in four 
years — wants to sabotage the 
shop — sleepy — seen roaring 
through Quincy — defender of 
our nation, National Guard — "1 
don't check your act." 





STEPHEN CHARLES WINOKUR 

"Ruby" 

"Rube" — bound for the Univer- 
sity of Vermont — would like to 
run the theater his own way — 
likes to sleep in school — with 
Doug, Carl, and El — hates los- 
ing arguments to Doug — his hot 
Dodge — loves French fried po- 
tatoes with ketchup — basketball 
star — headed for the track team? 
— dislikes quiet girls — good per- 
sonality — dead-eye — "Looky, 
looky, looky!" 




WANDA WEEKS 

"Sincerely" 

"Wheaties" — destination: Florida 
— ambition: to become a fashion 
illustrator — Gellar's Lunch — 
sixth period study, ugh! — seen 
everywhere — Joan and the sum- 
mer kids — Dick — special abil- 
ity: getting into messes — Mano- 
met — pizza and spaghetti — likes 
to have fun — Louie, and Ford 
convertibles — submarine sand- 
wiches — oh, to travel — "Oh, 
great!" 



AUDREY MAUDE WOOD 

"Street of Dreams" 
"Li'l Aud" — business school — 
pizza and orange crush — wants 
to be able to knit — one of the 
KK girls — private secretary — 
dance committees — likes study 
hall — "my little sister" — seen 
with Patty, Loretta, Pus, and 
Vickie — seen working at Smith's 
News — ticket seller — dislikes 
gym — pet peeve: submarines — 
to have a new car — likes Mr. 
Smiley — "O.K." 




ImH"" 




NORMAN JOSEPH WOOD 

"A Man Chases A Girl" 
"Skip" — any college that takes 
him — "I don't know what I'll do 
when I get there" — Celtic fan — 
ice cream — Deveau, Kaiser, and 
Bob — "I could say something 
but I won't" — at Mel's — one of 
Puritan's clerks — Oh, to teach 
Mr. Holmes — a pigeon racer — 
feels that the radio course should 
be replaced by one in T.V. — 
"Waka Jove!" 



MARILYN ZAVAL 

"I Got Rhythm" 
"Lynn" — P.H.S.'s pianist — digs 
that Dave Brubeck — Jazz! — 
keeps gum companies in busi- 
ness — Tassy 's — Kingston boys! ! 

— B.U. School of Music — one of 
our fashion plates — a Currier's 
girl — seen in a gray Plymouth 

— the KK Girls — Jeanette — Oh, 
those problems! — Who's at U. of 
Mass.? — "Gee! the Theory!" — 
Unique earrings — "Let's go some- 
place." 




JOHN STEPHEN ZABOLY 

"Aloha Oe" 

"Agar" — seen with "Flip" — 
moving to Maiden — likes Welch 
rarebit — the strong, silent type 

— dislikes the Norris jug — chef 
in Currier's — roots for the Phils 

— plays the uke — a Jackie Glea- 
son fan — down at the Boy's 
Club — "Oh sure" — picture him 
in Hawaii with Halli Loki — "Is 
that right?" 





ERNESTINE ROSE ZINANI 

"Get Happy" 

'"Ernie" — to become a nurse — 
wants to put one over on Mr. 
N. — dislikes fast drivers — pet 
peeve: Jean — one of the many 
fans of Mrs. Raymond — seen with 
Judy, Jean and Maggie — hockey 
and basketball star — likes ham 
sandwiches — spends a lot of time 
in the gym — driving her father's 
truck — those pa jama parties! 



JOHN JOSEPH ZANIBONI 

"Take Me out to the Ball Game" 
"Toodles" — going in the U.S.A.F., 
but doesn't know what he'll do 
when he gets there — another 
Red Sox fan — Dom the profes- 
sor — pioneer in Home Arts; or 
is it poisoneer? — all food; it's 
the best — "Here today, gone to- 
morrow!" — at Pal's lunch — "My 
only dream is to see all young 
women teachers in High School." 





ANN MARIE ZUCCHELLI 

"Hey There" 

"Ara-z" — headed for college — a 
future teacher — those Latin 
translations — dislikes icy roads 
on basketball nights — still an- 
other lover of pizza and fried 
clams — experience is her fav- 
orite teacher — works at the 
Samoset House — seen with the 
gang — crazy about babies — oh, 
to have children that won't get 
older than five — good basketball 
and tennis player — "Holy Cow!" 



CLASS BANQUET 





"/Itt tic *76i*tfi tytc die 

When we were asked by the National Society 
of the Daughters of the American Revolution to 
pick from our class our Best Girl Citizen, Dora- 
Lee Roulston came into everyone's mind. Selected 
for character, ability, and service, Dora-Lee well 
deserves this honor. Not only is she gifted with 
a sparkling personality, but she has also been 
extremely active in school affairs. A member of 
the Honor Group, a spirited cheerleader, and one 
of the mainstays in girls' sports, she is planning 
to attend Green Mountain Junior College in Ver- 
mont. It is with great pleasure that we salute 
our Best Girl Citizen, Dora-Lee Roulston. 




SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 

Left to Right: Claire Victoria, Secretary; Don Medara, Vice-President; Douglas Beane, 
President; Howard Benassi, Treasurer. 




JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS 

Left to Right: Joan Whiting, Vice President; David Besegai, President; 
Gerald Pimental, Treasurer; Janice Cavicchi, Secretary. 




SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS 

Left to Right: Suzanne Lekberg, Secretary; Clyde Brini, Vice President; 
Stephen Buttner, President; Ronald Soares, Treasurer. 



The realm of music knows no boundaries. Out of its earlier offspring, 
discovered in the jungles of tropical countries, jazz has embedded its roots 
in the saga of American music. Bands may be found improvising on stand- 
ards from high school gyms all the way up to concert halls, always trying 
to attain that free-flowing style symbolic of jazz. 

At a recent Philharmonic concert in New York the crowds wildly 
applauded the cool trumpet tones of Daniel Caton and his quartet, featuring 
Al Tadgell on sax, Marilyn Zaval on piano, and Everett (Dody) Doten on 
bass. The singers were Judy Green and Jean Caron, who had just gradu- 
ated from the Boston Consexvatory of Music. 

During intermission, I recognized Douglas Beane talking to socialites 
Claire Victoria and Nancy MafHni, no doubt soliciting votes in the coming 
election. Petite Carol Marois had just twisted her ankle on the stairs and 
Drs. Phillip Sherman and Carlton Resnick immediately tried to comfort 
her. Peter Miller and Marcia Hasz, eminent psychologists, asserted that 
she imagined the pain. Rita Dietlin and Pat Brady recognized the situation 
as excellent material for use in theses for medical degrees. Cynthia 
Simmons, one of New York's ten best-dressed women, was wearing a hat 
that denied all laws of physics. 

Dr. Philip Canevazzi, who had improved the supersonic drill for den- 
tistry, was consulting with Dr. Mary K. Bradley about his pedigreed poodle. 
I also heard Ralph Matinzi, the Latin professor at Plymouth University dis- 
cussing the Eastern Asia question with Ambassador to Istanbul Bernard 
Barufaldi and Ambassador to Russia Elliot Segal. Sitting beside us were 
mathematician, Ernestine Zinani with her prominent New York secretary, 
Eleanor Bates. 

While discussing counterpoint with Edward Alsheimer and Paul 
Borsari, both accomplished musicians, I noticed the producer of this con- 
cert Walter McCann, a connoisseur of fine jazz, with assistant Theresa 
Furtado, the inspiration of the featured quartet. Next I discovered some 
boys in a typical football huddle — and no wonder — this group was com- 
posed of Larry Paul, 1965 All-American; Jerry Goodwin, National Golf 
Champion; Francis Barrett and Charles Tassinari, Celtic stars; tennis star, 
Kenneth Hall; track star, Don Medara; celebrated Rose Bowl linemen, 
James Ruffini and Jack Staples with sportswomen Myrna Hadaway, 
Carolyn Holmes, and Margaret Whalen. 

Opposite us I saw Carol Foley, editor of Vogue, with photographers 
Carol Melahoures and Charlie Barrett, admiring the Mary Po originals 
of professional models, Janis Anthony, Audrey Scagliarini, and Barbara 
Warnsman, 

As the house lights dimmed once more, Anne LeShana, diplomat to 
India, hastened her assistants Claire Mitchell and Phyllis Estes to their 
seats. 

After the concert, Thomas Doten and Leo Amiro, wealthy horse own- 
ers, invited us to their penthouse in Benjamin Anderson's new multi-mil- 



lion dollar hotel on 5th Avenue. Whisked away by limousines driven by 
professional test-drivers Paul DiSalvatore, Eugene Gill, Edward Jokinen, 
and Harold Lamminmaki, we arrived at our destination without a scratch. 

Ann Alberghini and Dora-Lee Roulston, famous for their social affairs, 
led us into the living room, which had been transformed into a musical 
fairyland by Carol Harney, prominent New York artist and designer, and 
assistants Phyllis Proctor and Janice Cadorette. Jacqueline Courtney, 
Constance Deighton, and Pat McGrath, home economists, had prepared a 
dinner fit for the most exacting gourmets. 

While watching the rest of the guests arrive, I was astonished to see 
that most of the members of my graduating class at Plymouth High School 
were present. Ronald Gomes, Mayor of Carver, and his selectmen, Eugene 
Spinola and John Zaboly, were entering, surrounded by T. V. actresses 
June Arponen, Cynthia Ferguson, Joan Gellar, and those famous comedians 
Nicholas Carreira and Rita Cappella. Walter Cleveland, the quiet director 
of that smash hit Kiss Me Sal was discussing his next musical comedy with 
actress Ann Marie Zucchelli and her escort Ronald Kritzmacher, the 
yacht broker from Wall Street. 

Alvin Boyer, Stuart Gulhang and Phil Rouvales were performing a 
few of their T. V. ad-libs to enthusiasts Louise Atwood, Barbara Bosari, 
and Joyce Boutin, all advertising agents for prominent New York channels. 

Sponsors Richard Fernandas, head of the New York Branch of Butt- 
ner's; Skippy Nickerson, owner of several fishing concerns; Richard 
O'Keefe, proprietor of "Cinq et Dix"; and Jon Perkins, junior partner of 
Victoria and Casal were trying to get Danny Tong, famous magician, and 
his pretty assistant, Carol Forni, to sign a five year contract. 

Many women alumnae were present who had just been awarded honors 
— Marilyn Arons, Dental Hygienst of the year; Lulu Curtiss, Woman of 
the year; Audrey Carr, Miss Petite of 1965; and Marie Viella, Teacher of 
the year. 

Look! Was that a gold star that I saw glittering on Winsor Savery's 
uniform? George Barlow, John Ferreira, and Gerald Furtado had just been 
awarded the purple heart! The briny deep had attracted some of our best 
boys — Donald Boudreau, Dave Cushing, Vincent Tassinari and David Tor- 
rence. The Marines had secured quite a mess sergeant when John Bates 
enlisted — steak every day. The Army had also cast its khaki net, and 
they were indeed lucky to obtain such four star generals as George Govoni, 
Ronald Moran, and Peter Saisa. Donald Perrault, a veteran; of the "Five 
and Ten," found Army canteen work quite agreeable, while David Watson 
and Norman Wood, born mechanics, rolled along in giant tanks. 

We pieced what information we had together in order to see what life 
had offered to the rest of our class. Paula Goddard had just finished 
writing a novel entitled Coasts of New England, which emphasized Plym- 
outh Harbor. Pauline Heath, Dot Pacheco, Betty Ann Lemieux, Marjorie 
Kingman, and Joanne Mosher, all New York secretaries, had just returned 



from a world tour. Judith Nunez was completing her formal education at 
the Sorbonne in Paris, where Miss Janice Wall is now exchange professor. 

A helicopter piloted by Thomas Pickles and co-pilot Ronald Patterson 
had just landed on the spacious roof of the hotel. Loretta Borgatti, the 
stewardess, certainly- made a unique entrance. 

What had happened to those gals who had glittered on stage during 
Mrs. Urann's memorable productions? Steven Winokur, wealthy Cali- 
fornia businessman, and artist John Zaniboni suggested that we telephone 
Rita and Roberta Matinzi, who write the society column for Mademoiselle. 
They were out of town at the time but their efficient secretaries Wanda 
Weeks, Ella Kingsley, and Patricia Santarpia furnished us with their 
Cairo, Egypt, telephone number. The alertness of telephone operators 
Fannie Hadaway and Carta Robbins had us speaking with the girls in 
no time. 

Rita and Roberta informed us that Gary Smith was filming his next 
picture entitled Desert Thirst, starring Howard Benassi and Lorraine Motta. 
Carol Petocchi, with the assistance of Marilyn Kivi, Margaret and Sonja 
Maki, and Shirley Williams, had designed the desert apparel for the film 
and would display the garments in a New York Spring Fashion Show. 
Previewing the film for us, they related, in strictest confidence, that 
Danine Potter was performing a desert scene with chorus girls, Priscilla 
Smith, Pat Stefani, and Audrey Wood, which would win her an "Oscar." 
The stage crew consisting of Leonard Reggiani, and J. Ernest Roy, had con- 
structed a mirage of real water — the largest swimming pool in the world. 

Satisfied that all the graduating class had been accounted for, we 
settled back to enjoy the party. Floating from another room, the pulsating 
song How High The Moon, the epitome of jazz, mingled with the voices of 
our friends, confirming our opinion that the high spirit and determination 
of the class of '55 still lingered. 

PATRICIA BRADY 
Class of '55 




SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Standing: Mr. Robert Bowler, Mr. Spencer Brewster, Mr. Alton Cavicchi. 
Seated: Mr. Mauro Canevazzi, Mr. Ralph Weaver, Mr. Donald Welch, Mr. Joseph 
Contente. 



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"Since You Went Away" 

The Alumni Staff of the PILGRIM Staff of the English Department of the 
Plymouth High School situated on Lincoln Street in the Town of Plymouth 
in the County of Plymouth in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the 
United States on the continent of North America of the Western Hemi- 
sphere on the Earth in the Universe takes great pleasure to present to you 
this Alumni report. 

ALUMNI 

1950: 

Beverly Carton — Mrs. Joseph Dietlin — Carver 

Louise Gavoni — Mrs. Anthony Soares — Music instructor in Worcester 

Shirley Knight — Mrs. R. Brown 

Richard Benassi — Milkman 

Clyde Balboni — Army in Germany 

Mary Ellen Gault — Nurse in Red Cross — Mrs. Willard Hunt 

Richard Weaver — Navy 

Mary Cotti — Mrs. Chuck Mathewson 

Jacqueline Boyer — Mrs. Francis Rohmer — Rhode Island School of Design 

Lorraine Monti — Mrs. Remo Zammarchi 

1951: 

Wilfred Doyan — Army 

Joan Neri — Mrs. Richard Darsch 

John Pinto — Navy 

Rosanne Rosetti — Telephone Co. office 

Mansel Crowell — Army 

Shirley Henry — Secretary in Washington, D. C. 

Jane Hilton — Rhode Island School of Design 

Alvin Wood — Air Force — Georgia 

Raynor Taylor — Northeastern University 

David Pyle — Bowdoin College — Maine 

1952: 

Dorothy Chase — Fisher Jr. College 

Lawrence Benassi — Assistant instructor at Wentworth Institute 

Marilyn Griffith — Boston University 

Ray Bussolari — State Teachers College, East Stroudsburg, Penn. 

Brooks Johnson — Tufts track star 

Joe Mondeaux — Army 

Bob Morini — Graduate of Worcester Poly Tech 

Sabra Carpenter — Medical secretary in New Jersey 

Richard Blaisdell — Massachusetts School of Art, Boston 

Wayne Caton — University of Massachusetts 

1953: 

Ray Longhi — University of Massachusetts — chemistry 

Ce-Ce Jacobs — Nursing at Quincy City Hospital 

Adele Vandini — Boston University 

Joyce Contente — Middlebury 

Margaret Ruediger — Mrs. John Carton 

David Santos — Holy Cross 

Richard Carlin — Brown — chemistry 

Phil Carletti — Bates — football 

Ben Cohen — Tufts 

Bill Harney — Army 

1954: 

Donna Barufaldi — Boston University 

Joyce Brenner — Mrs. Bob Morini 

Joanne Goodwin — Mass. State's Women's Golf Champ — Florida 

Johnny Vancini — Boston College 

Roger Weaver — Rhode Island School of Design 

Ira Carlin — Columbia University — New York 

Karin Engstrom — Wellesley 

Marie Hasz — Valparaiso University — Indiana 

Marilyn Rossi — Lawyer's secretary 

Diana Silva — Nursing at Brockton Hospital 



"Memory Lane" 

As we look back to the beginning of Memory Lane 
we see ourselves as small, bewildered sophomores over- 
whelmed by the great big seniors. Enthusiasm was 
soon aroused by the many activities offered, and once 
we got into the swing of things, most of us decided we 
rather liked high school. 

We had the privilege of smoothing the road for 
people less fortunate than ourselves by contributing 
to the Andree Straker Fund. This first year seemed 
to be a year of firsts. The landmarks along the way 
were our first science fair, our first inter-school sports, 
and our first Student Council meetings. In the Spring 
we held our successful Spring Frolic. We finished the 
year by selecting four spirited cheerleaders: Dora-L.ee> 
Ann, Barby, and Nancy. 

Returning a little reluctantly from our summer 
vacation, we traveled farther along the lane by com- 
pleting the B.U. tests. Highlights of the year were the 
SA.S. convention held at P.H.S.; C'est La Vie, under 
the direction of Ma Urann; and Honor Society elec- 
tions, which included eight of us. Plymouth High was 
doubly honored with the winning of the South Shore 
Championship by our basketball team, which included 
Larry, Howie, Charlie, and "Little Cousy" Barrett, and 
the excelling of two of our classmates, Pat and Marcia, 
at the Massachusetts Science Fair. Hard work by us 
juniors made the Moonlight Prom a dance to be held in 
the hearts of many for a long time. Much to our amaze- 
ment, we found we had covered two thirds of the way, 
and were ready for the last leg of the journey. 

The first milestone encountered in our senior year 
was the election of Doug, Don, Claire, and Howie as 
our capable class officers. Work on the Pilgrim got 
under way under the leadership of Carol, our hard- 
working patient editor-in-chief, and the seniors held 
a not too successful dance called Krismus Kapers. 
Things looked up for the state of Massachusetts when 
Mr. Benassi was elected to participate in Good Gov- 
ernment Day. The seniors found the road a little rough 
with College Boards and attempts to plan their future. 
A note of gaiety was injected in the form of the annual 
student-faculty basketball game. All during this last 
year the senior honor group was busy planning 
graduation. 

Looking back over the trail we found we've had 
a lot. of good times. Despite the many bends in the 
road and supposedly insurmountable barriers, we finally 
reached our goal; the successful end of one long road, 
and the beginning of a still longer one. 

JUDITH NUNEZ 
Class of '55 




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"School Days" 




SEPTEMBER — 

Get Together Dance! The S.A.S. started the 
school year off with a dance which put our 
new members into the spirit of P.H.S. Pro- 
ceeds helped to pay for the cheerleaders' new 
uniforms. 



OCTOBER — 

Columbus Day! Under the direction of Miss 
Iris Albertini, the Sophomores presented an 
assembly by which we were acquainted with 
many unknown, yet pertinent facts of the life 
of Columbus. 

On the 19th we were all inspired by Major 
Daniel "Chappie" James' informal talk on 
"Americanism." The tall handsome, Negro jet 
pilot spoke with a startling sincerity and then 
sang his favorite spiritual, "Sometimes I Feel 
Like a Motherless Child." 





NOVEMBER — 

"A Note To Myself!" Under the 
direction of Miss Jeanette Jacques, 
the French III class presented a 
playlet which portrayed the real 
meaning 'of Thanksgiving. In ad- 
dition we enjoyed musical entertain- 
ment by pianist Marilyn Zaval and 
vocalist Larry Paul. Adding to the 
occasion was a trumpet duet by 
David Besegai and Danny Caton 

Listening with great enthusiasm 
we enjoyed the lecture of Oswald 
A. Blumit, a minister, evangelist, 
philanthropist and world traveler, 
who has had unusually rich 
experiences in the Baltic coun- 
tries behind the Iron Curtain. 



DECEMBER — 

Christmas Dance! The grad- 
uating class sponsored this 
event, which was greatly en- 
joyed by all. A huge Christ- 
mas tree, lavish seasonal 
decorations, a door prize, spot 
dance and refreshments made 
the evening one long to be 
remembered. 



"School Days" 



December also marked a great 
loss when Miss Margie Wilber 
retired on December 31st. We 
will always remember her for all 
her services to the school and for 
what we gained from her classes. 
At a special assembly we presen- 
ted her with an electric coffee 
urn. The ensemble sang a num- 
ber of songs which added to the 
occasion. 



JANUARY — 

The Galloneers! We enjoyed a 
concert by the members of Brock- 
ton High School's all male vocal 
group. They sang a diversified 
selection of popular and classical 
songs under the direction of Mr. 
Rodney May. 



FEBRUARY — 

Washington's Birthday! An as- 
sembly directed by Mr. John 
Packard was presented to the 
school on Friday, February 18th 
with a guest speaker, Reverend 
Newman Woodbury, who spoke 
on conditions in Burma and Bur- 
mese education. 

We were fortunate in having 
for a speaker George C. P. Olsson, 
Clerk of the Plymouth Superior 
Court. His talk was based on the functions 
of the local and higher courts and of the 
various crimes which are considered at each 
level. He acquainted us with some of our 
future responsibilities as citizens and as jurors. 



MARCH — 

On the 2nd Mr. Mongan introduced a panel 
of local business and professional men who 
interpreted "The Four Way Test." The Rotary 
Club was our guest and also provided the 
speakers — Dr. Harold Hamilton, Mr. James 
Leland, Mr. Donald Welch and Reverend 
Newman LaShana. 

The Ides of March brought us Julius Caesar, 
which was shown to us through the co-opera- 
tion of the Old Colony Theater. 






rfctiutttet 



Honor Groups at 
Plymouth High School 

Any member of the senior class, who, at a determined point in his 
school year, has maintained a scholastic average of eighty-five percent 
for three years, finds himself named as a member of the Plymouth High 
School Honor Group. This year's group of twenty-nine is one of the 
largest ever organized by P.H.S., and it is the privilege of this group to 
do most of the planning for graduation in June. Weekly meetings are held 
to discuss committee work and other phases of the planning which will 
help make the senior class and the community proud of graduation. 

One of the highest honors conferred by Plymouth High School is the 
election into the Massasoit Chapter of the National Honor Society. These 
elections are based upon the student's character, service to his school, 
leadership and scholastic rating. The qualifications of each candidate are 
studied by the faculty, and those who have shown themselves to be worthy 
of this distinction are selected. These names are placed before the students 
for voting, and the candidates selected are initiated into the chapter at a 
candle light installation service held in March. Both juniors and seniors 
are eligible for election, but juniors elected must be re-elected in their 
senior year in order to remain in the society. In the future our National 
Honor Society members see the organization as a richer and stronger 
group through its service to the school in undertaking social activities 
for the student body. 




HONOR GROUP 

Top Row: John Ferreira, Elliot Segal, Douglas Beane, Phillip Serman, Philip Canevazzi, 

Ralph Matinzi, Carlton Resnick. 
Middle Row: Phyllis Estes, Ann Marie Zucchelli, Nancy Maffini, Mrs. Miriam Raymond, 

Elizabeth Lemieux, Jeanne Caron, Barbara Warnsman, Dora-Lee Roulston. 
Bottom Row: Carol Marois, Fannie Hadaway, Janice Cadorette, Walter McCann, Carol 

Foley, Mary Bradley, Patricia Brady. 




NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 
Back Row: Alan Paul, Philip Canevazzi, Douglas Beane, Walter McCann, Phillip 

Sherman, Howard Benassi, Robert Miskelly, Peter Romano, Gerald Harper. 
Front Row: Marguerite Hasz, Carol Foley, Patricia Brady, Elizabeth Lemieux, Joan 

Whiting, Barbara Warnsman, Dora-Lee Roulston, Claire Vancini, Nancy Maffini. 



S. A. S. Awarded Citation By WBZ 

The John Freedom Citation was awarded to the students of Plymouth 
High School by station WBZ and WBZA for "recognition of significant 
service in the community, and the furtherance of the principle that 
'Responsibility is the Price of Freedom.' " The Student Activities Society 
include all students and faculty in its membership, and annually carries 
on the school project, which is based on the slogan "Just a penny each day." 

Since 1946 the students have voted to undertake a project. At that 
time each home room sent a monthly "Care" package to relatives of 
students in wax-torn Europe. Since 1948 the students have contributed 
nearly one thousand dollars each year to some outstanding charitable 
organization. Charities selected by the students are as follows: The Chil- 
drens' Medical Center; The Amputee Veterans of Massachusetts; the 
"Jimmy Fund"; The Cerebral Palsy Foundation of Massachusetts, the Mary 
MacArthur Polio Unit in Wellesley (in memory of Andree Straker); the 
Plymouth County Hospital at South Hanson — "TV to Fight TB in 1954"; 
and this year Muscular Dystrophy was the selection of the students. 

The Student Council is the executive body of the S.A.S. and for the 
past five years Miss Downey has served as faculty advisor. Before that 
time Miss Locklin served for many years. This year President Howard 
Benassi has had the able help of co-chairmen Nancy Maffini and Mary Po. 

The students are very happy to receive this citation from WBZ and 
WBZA and the gift from the Massachusetts Principal's Association, but 
especially proud that we have been able to help our fellow men. 
"Responsibility is the Price of Freedom." 



STUDENT COUNCIL 

Top Row: Robert Miskelly, Gerald Harper, Janet Lamborghini, Timothy Brady, Steven 

Buttner. 
Middle Row: Rollene Darsch, Claire Vancini, Marie Serra, Tara Sturgis, Miss Ellen 

Downey, Judith Holmes, Jacqueline Nunez, Jane Carpenter, Judith Remick. 
Bottom Row: Mary Po, Marilyn Zaval, Walter McCann, Carlton Resnick, Patricia 

Stefani, Howard Benassi, Joan Whiting, David Besegai, Gary Smith, Nancy Maffini, 

Carol Foley. 




M. D. FUND COLLECTORS 

Top Row: Gerald Harper, Judith Holmes, Timothy Brady. 

Middle Row: Rollene Darsch, Claire Vancini, Marie Serra, Tara Sturgis, Miss Ellen 

Downey, Janet Lamborghini, Jacqueline Nunez, Jane Carpenter, Judith Remick. 
Bottom Row: Carlton Resnick, Marilyn Zaval, Walter McCann, Howard Benassi, Nancy 

Maffini, Mary Po, Joan Whiting, David Besegai, Robert Miskelly, Carol Foley, Gary 

Smith. 




TEN-CENT-A-WEEK COLLECTORS 

Top Row: Leonard Venturi, Gerald Pimental, Stephen Thomas, Robert Barufaldi, Fred 

DeVeau, Alan Santos, Richard Doyon, Andrew Balboni. 
Middle Row: Mary Waitt, Beverly Fohrder, Brenda Pioppi, Janice Cavicchi, Marie 

Serra, Janice Morgardo, Barbara Sampson, Judith Brenner, Nancy Weston, Barbara 

Cremonini, Mr. Mario Romano. 
Bottom Row: Dorothy Pacheco, Claire Victoria, Carol Marois, Phyllis Estes, Ann 

Alberghini, Howard Benassi, Thomas Pickles, Richard Fernandes, Ronald Kritz- 

macher, Daniel Tong. 




JUNIOR CLASSICAL LEAGUE 

Top Row: Carol Ann Greaves, Steven Buttner, Charles Skulsky, Thomas Packard, 
James Swanton, Suzanne Lekberg, Tara Sturgis, Jean Perdigo, Joan Hanson, Judith 
Douglas, Janet Lamborghini. 

Middle Row: Mr. John Tavernelli, Paula Coombs, Marguerite Hasz, Judith Remick, 
Gerald Harper, Joan Whiting, Helen Holman, Carol Lacey, Barbara Cremonini, 
Jacqueline Nunez, Gail Sears, Jane Carpenter, Janet Balboni, Jean Hanson, Margot 
Ruffini, Rosalind Holmes. 

Bottom Row: Virginia Roderick, Dana Bumpus, Ethel Bussolari, Philip Canevazzi, Carl- 
ton Resnick, Bernard Barufaldi, Carol Foley, Mary Bradley, Claire Vancini, Arlene 
Herries, Ann Savery, Ralph Matinzi, Phillip Sherman. 




RADIO CLUB 

Left to right: Mr. John Packard, Stephen Gilbert, David Cushing, James Beal, Alan 
Sherman, Charles Skulsky, Donald Perrault, Glen Simmons. 






PILGRIM STAFF 

Top Row: Rosalind Homes, Jeanne Caron, Charles Barrett, Elliot Segal, Winsor Savery, 
Robert Miskelly, Phillip Sherman, Bernard Barufaldi, George Sampson, Alan Sher- 
man, Janet Balboni, Jacqueline Nunez. 

Middle Row: Stephen Buttner, Elizabeth Lemieux, Barbara Bosari, Dorothy Pacheco, 
Audrey Wood, Patricia Stefani, Loretta Borgatti, Rita Dietlin, Ethel Bussolari, Theresa 
Furtado, Mary Po, Judith Green, Carol Pettigrew, Suzanne Lekberg, Marguerite 
Hasz, Carol Ann Greaves. 

Bottom Row: Carol Melahoures, Peter Miller, Philip Canevazzi, Carol Harney, Patricia 
Brady, Carol Foley, Mr. Roland Holmes, Claire Vancini, Mary Bradley, Marcia Hasz, 
Philip Rouvales, Carlton Resnick. 






BANK TELLERS 

Top Row: Elissa Benassi, Loretta Borgatti, Brenda Petocchi, Janice Morgardo, Joan 

Thissell, Dorothy Parker, Elizabeth Tubman, Sandra Watson. 
Middle Row: Miss Elizabeth Kelly, Diane Pizzotti, Patricia Lemieux, Ann Marie Pickles, 

Ann Marie Zucchelli, Frances Tibbetts, Betty Schneider, Rose Cannucci, Carole Ann 

Greaves, Vincent Salvi. 
Bottom Row: Barbara Bratti, Nancy Gulhang, Norman Wood, Barbara Sampson, Mary 

Lou Enos, Dora-Lee Roulston, Howard Benassi, Phyllis Estes, Roberta Matinzi. 




ENSEMBLE 

Standing: Clotilde Corvelo, Danine Potter, Judith Holmes, Diane Sturtevant. 
Seated: Jeanne Caron, Rita Matinzi, Roberta Matinzi, Marguerite Hasz. 




BAND AND DRUM MAJORS 

Top Row: Ronald Kritzmacher, Stephen Gilbert, Alfred Tadgell, Phillip Sherman, Mr. 

John Pacheco, Thomas Packard, Richard Tache, Alan Cavicchi, Paul Borsari. 
Middle Row: Judith Remick, Julia Barros, Shirley Williams, Carol Lacey, Richard West, 

Joan Whiting, Robert Strassel, Stephen Buttner, Leonard Reggiani, Victor Morini, 

Ronald Quintal, Claire Vancini, Daniel Tong. 
Bottom Row: Nicholas Carreira, David Bittinger, David Besegai, Daniel Caton, Russell 

Romboldi, Ronald Soares, Alton Silvia, Dennis Silva, Glen Simmons, Leonard Venturi, 

Peter Romano, John Bates. 




ORCHESTRA 

Standing: Mr. John Pacheco, Carol Lacey, Stephen Buttner, Ronald Soares, Phillip 
Sherman, Julia Barros, Daniel Tong, Richard Tache, Ronald Kritzmacher, Leonard 
Reggiani, Shirley Williams. 

Seated: Nicholas Carreira, Peter Romano, Glen Simmons, Dennis Silva, David Besegai, 
Daniel Caton, Paul Borsari, Alfred Tadgell, John Bates. 




SCIENCE SEMINAR 

Standing: Phillip Sherman, Robert Miskelly, Marcia Hasz, Carlton Resnick. 
Seated: Elizabeth Tubman, Rita Dietlin, Mary Bradley, Mr. Claiborne Young, Patricia 
Brady, Ernestine Zinani. 




ON A FIELD TRIP TO COLONEL CLARK'S 



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SUNSETTERS — ACTIVITIES COMMITTEE 

Standing:: Philip Rouvales, Carol Harney, Carol Foley, Mr. Claiborne Young, James 

Swanton, Mary Bradley, Marguerite Hasz, Glen Simmons. 
Seated: Charles Skulsky, Rita Dietlin, Marcia Hasz, Patricia Brady, Margie Clausson, 

Dorothy Parker, Bernard Barufaldi, Alan Sherman. 




PRESS CLUB 

Top Row: Charles Barrett, Elliot Segal, Peter Miller, Bernard Barufaldi, Ralph Matinzi. 
Middle Row: Marguerite Hasz, Tara Sturgis, Janet Lamborghini, Jacqueline Nunez, Gail 

Sears, Carol Ann Greaves, Janet Balboni. 
Bottom Row: Phillip Sherman, Carlton Resnick, Mary Po, Mary Bradley, Carol Foley, 

Rita Matinzi, Marcia Hasz, Mr. John Tavernelli. 




LIBRARY STAFF 

Standing: Diane Sturtevant, Janet Lamborghini, Mr. Arthur Pyle, Janet Balboni, Ruby 

Zinani, Theresa Furtado. 
Seated: Marcia Hasz, Ann Marie Zucchelli, Audrey Scagliarini, Carol Petocci, Lorraine 

Motta, Fannie Hadaway, Pauline Heath. 




OFFICE ASSISTANTS 

Standing: Elizabeth Lemieux, Eleanor Bates, Barbara Bosari, Fannie Hadaway, Carol 

Melahoures. 
Seated: Claire Victoria, Dorothy Pacheco, Ann Alberghini, Mrs. Marion Whiting, Marie 

Viella, Nancy Maffini. 



Tftelodtf o£ TOontU 



PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE 

I've seen the world, 
Peoples and Religions, — 
Wars and Peace, — 
Deaths of great leaders, 
Births of greater ones. 
I am the Past. 

I see the world — 

Americans, Russians, — 

Christians, Jews — 

Cold wars and an uneasy peace, 

Deaths of great leaders, 

Births of greater ones. 

I am the Present. 

I will see the world — 
Earthlings, Martians — 
Universal wars — 
Uneasy peace, 
Deaths of great leaders, 
Births of greater ones. 
I am the Future. 

CAROLE ANN GREAVES 
Class '57 



OUR LIGHTHOUSE 

On a distant shore a gleaming, 
Through the stillness of the night, 
Shines a beacon ever turning 
Guiding with each beam of light. 
As our ship of life now ventures 
Over calm and stormy seas, 
Tossing, veering, plunging onward, 
Or riding gently in the breeze — 
Like our lighthouse in the distance, 
Our goal at times is hid from view, 
Mists of time loom up before us 
Till that beam comes shining through, 
Our course is set, we're on our way 
With faith and courage in our hearts, 
As staunch we stand with helm in hand, 
We're ready and willing to do our part. 
At last we see the beacon gleaming, 
Clear and true its shining light, 
Well worth the toil and dreaming — 
Wondrous beacon in the night. 

PATRICIA STEFANI 
Class '55 



FLAKES OF LIFE 



Each human 
Is a snowflake, 
Frolicking through 
Life's sky — 
Blown by winds 
Of emotion, 
Or stilled by 
Wisdom's cry. 



JACQUELINE NUNEZ 
Class '57 



MUSING 

Ever the plant 
Reaching toward light, 
Ever tomorrow — 
The day and the night. 

Ever the flush, 
Unfolding to flower; 
Yet never again 
This one tranquil hour. 



CAROL FOLEY 
Class '55 



NATURE'S LACE 

A slight breeze 
Brushes the snowflakes 
And settles them softly 
Into light puffs of loveliness, 
Glistening in the moonlight. 

Deep shadows of the pines 
Creep across the icy stillness, 
Enveloping the whiteness 
In a fringe 
Of dark silhouettes. 



BARBARA ADAMS 
Class'57 



THE HAND OF GOD 

Behold the snow upon the ground, 

The flowers of spring, the bird's sweet sound. 

Behold the moon, in silence awed, 

For these are made by the Hand of God. 

Behold the stars that shine on high, 
The sun that rules the western sky; 
Behold these things and them applaud, 
These, too, are made by the Hand of God. 

Behold the white-capped waves of the sea, 
The wind caressing you and me; 
Behold the grass, the trees, the sod, 
These all are made by the Hand of God. 

Behold your fellow human being; 
Rejoice in living, hearing, seeing; 
We all should our own selves laud; 
We, too, are made by the Hand of God. 

JEANNE CARON 
Class '55 



LISTEN 

Three short hours we talked, 
Feeling young and free; 
We spoke of unimportant things 
As the moon rose o'er the sea. 

Over every worldly thing 
It spread its shining gleam, 
Enveloping us as we talked on 
In a silvery dream. 

And while a lacy gown of frost 
By an unseen hand was sewn, 
We gaily talked — oblivious 
To the ocean's stifled drone. 

ELIZABETH CROWELL 
Class '57 



THE SHOE FITS 

Three cheers for the shoeman who endures the day 
Of servicing women who doubtless do say, 
"Try this one, and that one, and those over there; 
I am in a hurry and do need a pair." 

You smile and you joke, but when work is all done, 
You sit down and think, "Was this really fun?" 
You've been very patient and been a good elf, 
But now you reveal your real, your true self. 

Experience has proved that it is very true 
That women are fickle when buying a shoe; 
Standards and fads, high heels and lows, 
Try to explain this — Why, lord only knows! 

ELLIOT SEGAL 
Class '55 




How Can America Sell Democracy Abroad? 

There is a price for living and a price for dying. All mankind knows 
that. For Americans the price of living is a free, competitive society that 
practices concern and respect for the God-given rights of all individuals, 
whoever they may be! Our problem in selling Democracy abroad is to get 
people to like, through concrete experiences, what we have to sell. The 
great diversity of culture makes our problem highly complex. Only in 
a world at peace can the spirit of man grow strong — and have time to 
act! By thought and deed, we must show sincere respect for the customs 
and ideals of others; in true Christian spirit help them solve their economic, 
political, and social problems; renew their faith in our common humanity; 
and revive in all our hearts that spirit of "reverence for life," without 
which man is but a clod! 

A substantial program of direct assistance, democratically arranged 
with native governments, is urgently needed to help the backward nations 
of the world build a more secure economy and to raise their standards of 
living. There is immediate need for engineers, health and disease experts, 
agriculturalists, educators, and technicians. However, technical aid must 
be bolstered by financial loans from the United States, private enterprise, 
and the World Bank. Billions of dollars have already been provided by the 
United States government, but more is urgently needed! Through the Point 
Four program, the Columbo Plan, and the United Nations Technical Assist- 
ance Program, the resources of underdeveloped countries can be made pro- 
ductive. Trade can then replace Aid! Reciprocal tariffs, and lower tariffs 
generally, will increase world trade, produce higher standards of living, 
make for better understanding, and create respect for the principles of 
Democracy. 

Morever, by working through such agreements as NATO and SEATO 
it is devoutly hoped that aggression can be checked and despotism curbed. 
Since disarmament is politically improbable for the present, America 
should resolve to surpass Russia in the development of atomic weapons. 
When nations see they can no longer use war as a method of solving prob- 
lems, for fear of promoting the use of a weapon that will destroy all life 
on this planet, democratic methods will be employed, and Democracy will 
be supreme! However, if America continues militarily to threaten the 
use of the atomic bomb, weaker nations will lose faith in our democratic 
objectives. Peace-time atomic pools and industrial reactors built on foreign 
soil and controlled by the United Nations will help in time to efface the 
memory of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. 

"The Voice of America" is an effective medium for explaining Democ- 
racy abroad. The program should render a balanced picture of our society. 
More political literature should be distributed. Working through the United 
Nations and private enterprise, United States funds can erect schools for 
the ignorant and supply instruction in trades. Intensification of the opera- 
tions of CARE will demonstrate our concern for the unfortunate through 
our program of democratically administered distribution of food, clothing, 
and medicine. 

Increased emphasis on the exchange of students and teachers would 
greatly strengthen understanding among nations. Hope for the spiritually 
starved can be provided by smuggling Bibles behind the Iron Curtain. Only 
film and literature truly representative of America should be sent 
abroad! An unbalanced diet of Western and Gangster pictures gives for- 
eigners a distorted and unfortunately, lasting view of our democratic society. 

CHRISTOPHER PYLE 
Class '57 



Miss Helen Johnson 

"The Typewriter Song" 




Miss Ellen Downey 

"After The Ball" 




Mr. John Pacheco 

"Music, 
Maestro, Please" 



Miss Jeanette Jacques 

"Mademoiselle 
de Paris" 






Mr. Arthur Pyle 

"Give Me The Facts" 




Mr. Edgar Mongan 
"The Commander" 




Miss Marjorie Knight 
Mr. Harold Rogers 

"Elephant's Tango" 




Mr. Richard Smiley 

"Let A Smile Be 
Your Umbrella" 



Mrs. 


Lydia 


Gardner 


"The 


Lord's 


Prayer" 




m ' 




- V 






^ 






~ *- 






mmm • 














T 
E 

A 
C 
H 

H 
E 



Mr. Donald Wilson 

"Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate 
The Positive" 





Mrs. Margaret Brown 

'"Dreamer's Holiday" 




Mr. Joffrey Nunez 

"In A Little Spanish Town" 



Mr. John Tavernelli 

"When Johnny Comes 
Marching Home" 




Mr. Mario Romano 

"I've Got My Eyes On You 




Miss Marietta Canaan 

"Zing A Little Zong" 




Mrs. Alice Urann 

"Ah, Sweet Mystery 
of Life" 



Mrs. Helen Bagnell 

"Very Thought Of You" 




J 



Mr. Claiborne Young 

"Young At Heart" 



Miss Pope 

"Say It With Music' 










5jj 


J 


i 


» 














— 



Mr. Carlo Guidaboni 

"Enjoy Yourself" 



Miss Elizabeth Kelly 

"You're The Top" 





Mr. John Packard 

"Will You Remember?" 



Mrs. Miriam Raymond 

"Something To Remember 
You By" 





Mt. Roland Holmes 

"For He's A Jolly 
Good Fellow" 




Miss Nellie Locklin 

"Smile, Smile, Smile" 



Mrs. Virginia Kingman 

"What's Cookin'?" 




%4 



Miss Iris Albertini 

"Say It With Flowers" 



Mr. Donald Mullen 

'When Clancy Lowered 
The Boom" 





IW. 





1 fix* ock 








1 f>^ « © ♦ f 














ft 



IN THE CLASSROOM 









© 



9 







V: 



f> 




COllfGE MATH POZZtf 



ACROSS 

1. The name, of a famous theorem in 
Geometry. 

6. The figure formed by the meeting of 

two lines in a point. 
8. A line that intersects any system of 

lines. 
11. Two hundred as the Romans wrote it. 

13. The x-axis and y-axis intersect each 
other at the . 

14. A direction. 

16. Angles subtended by arcs of a circle 
equal in length to the radius of the 
circle. 

18. Abbrev. for two angles and included 
side. 

20. A Swiss mathematician. 

23. A Greek geometer. 

24. A decagon has sides. 

25. Abbrev. for secant. 



DOWN 

1. A five sided polygon. 

2. Three sided figures. 

3. Parts of a circumference. 

4. The surface extent of any figure. 

5. The name of an adding machine com- 
pleted in 1946 by the Univ. of Penn. 

7. The name of a math teacher. 
9. Complex entity representatives of a 
directed magnitude. 

10. Abbrev. of a trigonometic ratio. 

11. The segment joining any two points of 
a circle; (make word plural). 

12. A trigonometic ratio. 

15. Exactly the same in measure. 

17. The man who developed the Harvard 
Mark I Calculator. 

19. Two points are symmetrical with re- 
spect to a straight line, called the 

of symmetry; (make word plural). 

21. Abbrev. for logarithm. 

22. A quantity which taken as a factor a 
number of times, produces another 
quantity. 



LATIN 




George 

Husbandman 







5 



Barbara 

Strange 




Bernard 

Bold as a bear 




M. Katherine 
Pure 





Mary 

Rebellious 



John 

Gracious 




"MUSIC IN THE AIR" 



Agitate, Strepite, et Volvite! 
Obscurate, Obscurate Luces 
Melos Amoris 
Homo Puellam Sectatur 
Imbecillus Otto 



owo ^zgj3 

siiigiq d m ™a >m ia 

aAO-i jo Xpopift 



Crazy Couplets 




What makes this lad's 

expression so? 
He's just a victim of 

bow. 



These travelers among 

the stars 
Are from the war God's 

planet . 



He brightens every glen 

and hollow. 
He's the handsome God 





For service while waiting, 
All horses would stop 
For expert repair work 
shop. 



Make way, make way for our 

corpulent hero 
A real hot fiddler is our 



THE FIX 



Maru 



L-oui\se~Po 



Once upon a time there was a great King named Danomaus Malinkov, who ruled 
Elis. He was a terrific chariot jockey and was quite snobby about it. His chariot was 
low and sleek and with its white sidewalls and duals, it was the most to say the least! 

One day a little birdie told him that his prospective son-in-law would kill him. 
So he said that his daughter, Hippodamia Monroe, would be an old maid forever. 

Beautiful Hippodamia, who was Miss Elis of 436 B. C, had many, many beaus; and 
papa couldn't explain why she was forbidden to marry one of them. So he said that 
any boyfriend who could defeat him in a race could marry Hippy; but if the challenger 
lost, he'd get the chair at San Elis" Papa defeated one after the other. 

One day a rookie jockey named Pelops Di Maggio came up from the minors and 
challenged papa. Hippy knew that this man would be her lover and defeat papa 
(a woman's intuition). To insure a victory for Pelops, she hired a hood named Willie 
Myrtilus, to loosen a bolt on a wheel of papa's chariot. 

On the big day, there was standing room only at the stadium. Pelops got off to a 
good start as the race began. At the half-way mark, with Pelops ahead by a nose, 
papa's wheel flew off, and he hit the exit the hard way. A few weeks later Hippy and 
Pelops were wed and lived happily ever after with their twenty-seven children. 

BERNARD BARUFALDI 
Class '55 









/f«i*^ U ^9*" ,Se 



Une lef on de Franpis 

French III — Room 30 — is 
not just a class in Senior 
French in a New England 
high school, for under the 
adroit guidance of Made- 
moiselle Jacques it becomes 
a haven of French culture. 
Here les etudiants come for 
more than lessons in the 
proper endings of nouns 
and verbs and where to 
place the accent mark. One 
day may be spent in ap- 
preciation of French poetry 
and getting to know famous 
French authors. Another 
time the strains of Frere 
Jacques may issue from 
Room 30, not too tunefully 
it is true — but enthusias- 
tically nevertheless. Even 
the Whiffenpoof Song turns 
up in French on occasion. 
At times the lesson strays 
to the French Cuisine and 
such delicacies as crepe su- 
zette and bouillabaisse. And 
everyone gets to know the 
topography of France tres 
bien, for a well-worn map 
of that delightful country 
covers every impending 
test! 

Ainsi-Adieu! 



HjGCDEnz 



nmnmffl glflL 





>$\a1ion 




T1.L. Po 
J. Caron 



La Carte. Afysfe.r/ease 



c/ittcst s 




^o^nci*^ 




The art classes' campaign 
began in September when the 
front lines advanced to the 
Green. They were equipped 
with pencils, stools, and paper, 
all the modern weapons used 
in drawing. 

The class drew pictures of 
the surrounding area, and 
with their first successful at- 
tack behind them, advanced 
to the Yacht Club. There the 
troops found an abundance 
of fresh grapes. After a rough 
battle with these new prob- 
lems Mrs. Margaret Brown 
led her charges to Brewster 
Gardens. 

Here, much to the dismay 
of their leader, fighting broke 
out among the troops. The 
question involved was 
whether or not the town brook 
was salt or fresh water. After 
a heated argument, the op- 
posing forces followed the ad- 
vice of their leader, leaving 
the question a draw. 

United once again, the art 
class planned its next excur- 
sion. The women on the home 
front, the Women's Club, pro- 
vided the transportation for 
the next mission. This cam- 
paign was to ride by bus to 
Boston to visit the Gardner 
Museum. The troop enjoyed 
the paintings of great artists 
and the information given 
about famous painters. After 
a full day, the art class re- 
treated to the bus. 

Alas, cold weather had 
come to Plymouth and this 
brave battalion launched their 
campaign indoors. 

They set forth to draw peo- 
ple, still lifes, covers for the 
School Reports, and The Pil- 
grim. 

The class staged one final 
attack on the murals for grad- 
uation. And after completing 
these the troops retreated to 
their home bases. 





StOL ftf* 




Ua-te r.'f 




fluroks 




Future physicists. 



A pigeon gets a 
high school education. 




Budding chemists. 




The little people in 
white coats. 



'You can't hardly get 
them no more." 





Such concentration! 



'TW^y 



A man's place is in 
the kitchen! 




And awaaay we go! 



omvin 



™««»G c« 




■ 






_^M 



■ 



m 






■ 



■ t 




STARTING ELEVEN 

Standing: Ronald Gomes, Lawrence Paul, Timothy Brady, Jerome Santos. 
Kneeling: Rodman Nickerson, James Rufflni, John Staples, Charles Tassinari, Paul 
Borsari, Jon Perkins, Leonard Reggiani. 




le 
louth's courageous 
/erful backfield plowed through. 
IB not get their offense started until the final quar- 
Tr. It was in the last quarter that the Plymouth offense showed its capabili- 
ties to a crowd of loyal rooters. Plymouth scored one touchdown and 
were threatening to score another when the quarter ended, but this last 
quarter uprising was not enough as Plymouth went down to their third 
straight setback of the year by a score of 27 to 7. Great praise goes to our 
co-captains, Gomes and Tassinari, who played a bang-up game. 

And Never Turned Back 

A strong Whitman team was met by Plymouth on October 16 at Whit- 
man. Coach Don Mullen really wanted this game with the "Red Devils 
from the North" because they were undefeated and Plymouth hadn't yet 
won its first game. Plymouth High fought hard and held Whitman to 
twelve points in the first half, but the roof fell in on Plymouth in the 
last half as Whitman's massive line overpowered a scrappy Plymouth 
eleven and gave Plymouth their fourth straight loss to the tune of 32 to 
6. Jim Ruffini and Johnny Perkins were Plymouth's forward wall on 
defense, and they played a tremendous game considering the fact that 
they were facing one of the best lines around. 



Exerting At The Last Moments 

A fighting, never say die, Plymouth High football team played host 
to the "Big Green" of Abington in a hard-fought game. For ten minutes 
the team proved to Coach Mullen that it had absorbed his teachings and 
were going to upset a highly rated Abington High grid machine. What the 
Plymouth schoolboys showed in their first period play had the Plymouth 
fans in an uproar; and yet it all seemed to collapse when a more experi- 
enced team began to come to life in the remaining three periods of play, 
resulting in a 27 to 6 victory for Abington 1 High. Jerry Santos and Josie 
Alves were the bright spots for Plymouth. In late game desperation Alves 
threw a fine pass to Santos, who went over for Plymouth's lone touchdown 
of the day. 

More Vigorous Efforts Than Before 

When Plymouth's fighting Pilgrims played host to Hingham on Octo- 
ber 30, they knew they would be opposing the toughest team they would 
meet all season. Despite the great odds against them, a spirited Plymouth 
eleven held Hingham's powerhouse down to just fourteen points in the 
first half. Working from a seven man line, a defense Plymouth had learned 
in only three days of practice, the Hingham backs were stopped in their 
tracks as they tried to break through the Plymouth bulwark. Hingham 
took to the air, and capitalizing on Plymouth's weak pass defense, scored 
almost all their points through the air. The fine running of our great back- 
field of Brady, Paul, Alves, and Santos proved futile as Plymouth lost 
another by a 27 to score. 

Result 

On November 6 Plymouth played host to a strong Barnstable eleven. 
Because of the loss of four of the regulars, Coach Mullen had to move co- 
captain Gomes from his regular end position to the backfield, and also 
send Larry Paul into the assignment of T-formation quarterback, both 
with only four days of drilling. Plymouth High could not get going until 
late in the fourth quarter and by that time the score was 19 to 0. Pass 
interference gave Plymouth a first down on the Barnstable 12-yard line. 




After Larry Paul gained eight yards, Bernie Andrews smashed through 
the middle for the score. Gomes took a pitchout from Paul to his right 
and heaved a pass into the end zone to Resnick for the extra point, but it 
was too late as Plymouth lost 26 to 7. Bright spots for Plymouth were the 
fine catches of Carl Resnick and the smashing TD of Bernie Andrews. 

Plymouth 26, Falmouth 13 

On November 13, Plymouth High, the victim of seven straight defeats, 
unleashed its full season's wrath at Falmouth, as they powerhoused their 
way downfield four times and presented Coach Donald Mullen with a 26 
to 13 victory over Falmouth High in the final game of the season. It was a 
well-deserved win as the Shiretown schoolboys, paced by Larry Paul, co- 
captain, Ronny Gomes, and Tim Brady slammed incessantly at the Fal- 
mouth line, travelling 193 yards over the ground for a total of fourteen first 
downs. Plymouth's first score came early in the first quarter on a march 
from the Falmouth 24; after Bernie Andrews had run back a Falmouth 
punt, Paul and Gomes took it to the Falmouth four-yard line. After being 
held for two plays, Larry Paul skirted his right end for the touchdown. 
Willie Anderson, Plymouth guard, recovered a Falmouth fumble on the 
Cape 40 a few plays later to set up Plymouth's second touchdown. Co- 
captain Gomes brought the ball to the Falmouth six, and then Tim Brady 
swept his right end, cut back sharply, and went over standing up to make 
the score 12 to in favor of Plymouth. In the third period, Falmouth, back 
deep in their own territory, began to move, but the thrust was halted when 
Carlton Resnick intercepted a pitchout and gave Plymouth a first down on 
the Falmouth three-yard line. Gomes hit center for the touchdown and 
Jim Ruffini kicked the extra point. Plymouth's final score came in the last 
period after Jerry Santos had intercepted a Falmouth pass on the Falmouth 
forty-yard line. Led by Ronny Gomes, Plymouth smashed their way to the 
Falmouth four-yard line, where Larry Paul swept his left end for the 
score. Jim Ruffini place-kicked his second extra point of the game, and 
Plymouth had won their reward by a score of 26 to 13. 




Cross Country Course 

It was a year of upsets for the P.H.S. Cross-Country Team as the 
harriers won four meets and lost two, enabling Plymouth to have the 
sixth best Class C team in the state. 

The Blue and White ran into their usual nemesis October 4, as Plym- 
outh went to a 22-39 loss at the hands of Rockland, the '53 State Cross 
Country Champs. At the first home meet, luck again turned the other 
way, as the margin of victory for Middleboro was a tie for tenth place 
with a 27-28 score. 

The Brockton squad was stunned after learning that P.H.S.' first seven 
had beaten them 28-30, with the Rogersmen taking the first three places. 
The harriers kept up the pace the next week, whipping Whitman 15-64. 
Plymouth had the first eight men across for a shutout. 

A first year Scituate team found our course a bit difficult as the Plym- 
outh runners kept up their victory pace by winning 24-32. Medara finished 
second as he and a Scituate runner made a new record of 13:24. 

At the State Meet on November 3, in White Stadium, Franklin Park, 
Boston, again Don Medara distinguished himself by finishing ninth in a 
field of 97 runners as he led the team to a sixth place finish in the State 
Class C Race. 

Plymouth's top seven went to East Bridgewater the following week 
and ended the season with a second place finish in the Class A South Shore 
Race. It was the seniors for Plymouth who were the main point scorers. 
Tommy Pickles finished second, Don Medara third, Leo Amiro ninth, Cap- 
tain Pete Miller seventeenth, and Doug Beane nineteenth. 

So the season ended. Better records may be achieved under the fine 
coaching of Hank Rogers, but it will be a long time before such spirit and 
will to win can be equaled by any team. 




CROSS COUNTRY SQUAD 

Standing: Mr. Harold Rogers, Alan Ferguson, Christopher Pyle, Robert Miskelly, Fred 

Adams, Stewart Gulhang. 
Seated: James Swanton, Thomas Packard, Leonard Roby, Peter Miller, Thomas Pickles, 

Elliot Segal, Paul Douglas. 



mm 






r 








%M* AM . 

<f,vMnn>> <iYMQIirti 4 'oiYKOL'Ti' • ,.\ 



5 





BASKETBALL TEAM 

Top Row: Andrew Balboni, Donald Lopes, David Tavares, Richard Tache, Peter Romano, 
Stephen Buttner, Frank Gardner, Jerome Santos. 

Middle Row: Mr. Harold Rogers, John Pimental, James Marsh, Thomas Packard, Charles 
Tassinari, James Ruffini, David Nunes, Richard Dunham, Dennis Vecchi, Mr. Donald 
Mullen, Douglas Gray. 

Bottom Row: Walter McCann, Kenneth Hall, Stephen Winokur, Ronald Gomes, Law- 
rence Paul, Howard Benassi, David Besegai, Francis Barrett, Gerald Pimental. 



Off The Backboard 

The Blue and Whte journeyed to Abington on January 4 for their first 
Old Colony League game. Plymouth High School's mighty-mites had little 
trouble with the Abington five as P.H.S. romped to a 56-34 victory. Charlie 
Tassinari was high man for Plymouth with 19 points. 

A late game surge, aided by the bonus foul, gave Hingham High School 
a 49-38 decision over Plymouth High on January 7. Trailing all the way, 
Coach Roger's charges pressed the visitors at the opening of the fourth 
period, cutting the Hingham lead from 32 to 29 with five minutes left to be 
played. It was in the remaining time that Hingham hooped 17 points to 
Plymouth's 9. Again Charlie Tassinari was top man with 11 points. 

On January 11, playing one of the most terrific games of basketball 
ever played by P.H.S. ' basketball team, Plymouth broke Wareham's 22- 
game winning streak. The five starters Paul, Tassinari, Barrett, Besegai, 
and Benassi, cool, calm, and collected, played as great a game against as 
great a team as they will have to face this season. Plymouth's great de- 
fense and fine offensive play were the main reasons for Wareham's 53-50 
defeat. Larry Paul was high man with 20 points and little Franny Barrett 
came through with the clutch points when needed. 

On January 14, the Plymouth High hoopsters took a thrilling 58-56 
decision over a high-scoring Whitman five. An extra two points gained 
over their Whitman rivals in the third period of play proved to be the 
winning margin for Plymouth High. Captain Larry Paul was high man 
for Plymouth with 21 points. 





The Plymouth High School hoopmen made it three straight in Old 
Colony League competition on January 18 as they romped to a 65-37 win 
over Middleboro High. Coach Rogers gave the game over to his full line 
of reserves in the last period as his first line squad had set them up with a 
16 point lead. Captain Larry Paul paced his teammates with 19 points. 

Plymouth High School continues its hoop team upsetting on January 
21 when it took the measure of an overconfident Barnstable High 54-49. 
The Barnstable team badly misjudged the power and ability of the Plym- 
outh quintet, and it was Plymouth's excellent shooting from the free throw 
lane that finally won the game. Charlie Tassinari was high man with 20 
points, 16 of them being foul shots. 

The shooting from the floor was terrific as Plymouth trounced Rock- 
land on January 25 by a score of 50-43. The Blue and White led all the 
way, and the only reason for Plymouth's not winning by a wider margin 
was the fact that the first team reserves played almost the whole fourth 
quarter. Howie Benassi and Dave Besegai played a great game with their 
rebounding and shooting. 

Plymouth fought hard, but was unable to catch a fine-working Hing- 
ham team at Hingham on January 28. Although Captain Larry Paul scored 
26 points, the team scoring of Hingham gave Plymouth its second loss to 
Hingham in league competition. 

On February 1, P.H.S. met Abington High in a game which resulted 
in 12 of the 13 players on the Plymouth varsity getting into the scoring 
column as Plymouth romped to its sixth win by a score of 79-49. The 
Plymouth team was never in trouble, as everyone on the varsity saw 
service. Captain Larry Paul topped the scoring with 16 points, and Howie 
Benassi also played an excellent game. 

One of the most thrilling games of the year was played on February 
4, at Whitman High School. In a see-saw battle which saw Plymouth go 
behind in the second and third periods and then pull the game out in the 
final period, the Blue and White managed to beat Whitman by a narrow 
margin, 54-52. Franny Barrett and Charlie Tassinari were high men with 
14 points. 



Plymouth High turned on the steam on February 8, turning back a 
speedy Middleboro five by a score of 81-65. Plymouth dropped the ball 
through the hoop from all angles and raced to another league victory. The 
terrific rebounding and defensive play of Dave Nunes and Jim Ruffini 
sparked the Plymouth team in their victory. 

Plymouth High was far below par in their game against Wareham on 
February 11. Playing before one of the largest crowds to watch on Old 
Colony League game, Wareham could not seem to do anything wrong, and 
Plymouth couldn't seem to do anything right. Plymouth did not start to 
score until the latter part of the third period, and by that time they were 
behind by too much as they went down to their third defeat by a score of 
70-51. Captain Larry Paul was outstanding for Plymouth. 

Or. February 15, Plymouth High gave Rockland a lesson on shooting 
as the Blue and White trounced the boys from R.H.S. by a score of 87-68. 
The hoopsters from P.H.S. clinched a place in the Tech Tourney by winning 
this game. Larry Paul and Howie Benassi led the Plymouth team in 
scoring, and Steve Winokur was outstanding on his outside sets. 

On February 16, the Plymouth mighty-mites travelled to Falmouth 
to meet Falmouth High School. Foul shooting proved to be the deciding 
factor as Plymouth hooped 70 per cent of their free throws, while Falmouth 
made only 50 per cent of their foul shots. Led by Tassinari's 21 points and 
Larry Paul's 25 points, Plymouth downed Falmouth 66-58. 

After drawing a first round bye, Plymouth High had little trouble 
eliminating Canton High from South Shore title play 59 to 44 before a 
capacity crowd at the Stoughton High gym. The Shiretowners then trav- 
elled to Randolph where they were eliminated from the South Shore tour- 
ney by Whitman High 50 to 49 in a top-notch hoop thriller. Playing at 
Rockland High in the first consolation game in the history of the South 
Shore Tourney Plymouth High lost to Oliver Ames High of North Easton 
69 to 57 after leading by three points at the half. The "big three" — Paul, 
Tassinari, and Benassi — played great ball throughout the tourney. 





GIRLS' SPORTS 



HOCKEY 

Plymouth 7 

Plymouth 

Plymouth 2 

Plymouth 2 

Plymouth 

Plymouth 4 

Plymouth 11 



Bridgewater 

Middleboro 

Bridgewater 

Middleboro 

Marshfield 

Abington 

Orleans 



"A Hit And Run Affair" 

Twenty-five girls took Hockey time 
out from their studies this year to 
make up two enthusiastic teams. Un- 
der the able direction of Coach 
Knight the first team finished with 
a record of three games won, three 
lost, and one tied, and the second 
team won three and lost two. High 
scorer for the year was Dora-Lee 
Roulston with thirteen goals. What 
the girls lacked in skill they made up 
in team spirit and good sportsman- 
ship. Taking time out from their 
games, toward the end of the season 
the teams took a trip to Boston to see 
their coach play in a Boston versus 
Ireland game. All in all, although the 
girls were not undefeated, they did 
have a lot of fun, and learned what 
it means to be part of a team. 



BASKETBALL 




Plymouth 40 


Rockne 


35 


Plymouth 45 


Hingham 


27 


Plymouth 45 


Wareham 


25 


Plymouth 54 


Middleboro 


42 


Plymouth 45 


Bridgewater 


16 


Plymouth 30 


Rockne 


36 


Plymouth 34 


Abington 


30 


Plymouth 37 


Hingham 


24 


Plymouth 38 


Wareham 


28 


Plymouth 48 


Abington 


30 


Plymouth 61 


Bridgewater 


26 


Plymouth 45 


Middleboro 


42 



"A/most" 

The blue and the white started a 
successful season with the reporting 
of forty-five girls for practice in De- 
cember. Winning their first five 
games, Plymouth seemed invincible 
until their second game at Brockton 
with Rockne when they suffered their 
first loss. Recovering to win their 
next six Plymouth ended the season 
with eleven wins and one loss — 
almost, but not quite, undefeated. 
High scorer for the year was Carolyn 
Holmes. She was ably assisted by 
Dora-Lee Roulston, Carol Melahoures, 
and Myrna Hadaway as forwards, 
and Maggie Whalen, Ernie Zinani, 
Phyllis Estes, and Jeanne Fryermuth 
as guards. The second team finished 
up the year with 7 wins and 5 losses. 
Thanks goes to Coach Knight for the 
hard work and time she put in to 
make the girls team a winning one. 




GIRLS' HOCKEY TEAM 

Standing: Miss Marjorie Knight, Beverly Diaz, Janet Balboni, Carol Lacey, Tara Sturgis, 
Ariel Anderson, Jean Fryermuth, Lorraine Surrey, Paula Coombs, Jeanette Basler, 
Mary Ryan, Nancy Gulhang, Jacqueline Nunez. 

Seated: Rosalind Homes, Myrna Hadaway, Margaret Whalen, Phyllis Estes, Dora-Lee 
Roulston, Judith Nunez, Ernestine Zinani, Judith Bartlett, Marietta Nelson. 




GIRLS' BASKETBALL TEAM 

Top Row: Patricia Barrett, Beverly Diaz, Tara Sturgis, Janice Mosher, Jane Ballard, 

Claire Vancini, Gail Sears, Nancy Weston. 
Middle Row: Miss Marjorie Knight, Barbara Bratti, Lorraine Surrey, Mary Ryan, Ariel 

Anderson, Jean Fryermuth, Paula Coombs, Jeanette Basler, Janet Balboni, Marietta 

Nelson. 
Bottom Row: Anne Marie Zucchelli, Myrna Hadaway, Phyllis Estes, Dora-Lee Roulston, 

Carolyn Holmes, Ernestine Zinani, Margaret Whalen, Judith Nunez, Jacqueline Nunez. 



ANSWER PAGE 



When You And 1 


Were 


Voung" (hej/j 


i. 


Priscilla Smith 


2. 


Eleanor Bates 


3. 


Ann Marie Zucchelli 


4. 


Elliot Segal 


5. 


Richard Fernandes 


6. 


The Matinzis 


7. 


Lawrence Paul 


8. 


Dorothy Pacheco 


9. 


Patricia Stefani 


10. 


Shirley Williams 


11. 


Fannie Hadaway 


12. 


Janice Cadorette 


13. 


Dora-Lee Roulston 


14. 


Ernestine Zinani 


15. 


Carlton Resnick 


16. 


Phyllis Proctor 


17. 


Marilyn Arons 


18. 


Rita Dietlin 


19. 


Jeanne Caron 


20. 


Marilyn Zaval 


21. 


Carol Foley 


22. 


Patricia Brady 


23. 


Leo Morin 


24. 


Rita Cappella 


25. 


Carol Melahoures 


26. 


Mary Bradley 


27. 


Mary Po 


28. 


Jon Perkins 


29. 


Patricia McGrath 


30. 


Charles Tassinari 


31. 


Margaret Maki 


32.. 


Carol Harney 


33. 


Phyllis Estes 


34. 


Stuart Gulhang 


35. 


Ann Alberghini 


35. 


Ann Alberghini 


36. 


Wanda Weeks 


37. 


Elizabeth Lemieux 


38. 


Margaret Whalen 


39. 


Leonard Reggiani 


40. 


Barbara Warnsman 


41. 


Gary Smith 


42. 


Nancy Maffini 


43. 


Eugene Spinola 


44. 


Philip Canevazzi 


45. 


Claire Mitchell 


46. 


Marcia Hasz 


47. 


Audrey Scagliarini 


48. 


Joan Gellar 


49. 


Judith Nunez 


50. 


Ronald Moran 


51. 


Anne LaShana 


52. 


Janice Wall 


53. 


Lorraine Motta 


54. 


Myrna Hadaway 


55. 


Jacqueline Courtney 


56. 


Everett Doten 


57. 


Lulu Curtiss 



Answer to 
Cross Word Puzzle 



i s ra 
?i a ra 



a ra 



^lAM-Si^ 


E\ft\ 7 s\A\LmAMC\ 


El □ 

n □ 


a 
a 

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ub a q m 

ERE 


l%[E 


Th 


■ rIAIuI t lAlNh>BJ 


ll 


El 
1 


b 

am 


^ih*3 riraisiiia 
ei am 

UBCJ S H 


IrAlB Is |e-|c ■ llJ 



Key to Crazy Couplets 

1. Cupid 

2. Mars 

3. Apollo 

4. Blacksmith's 

5. Nero 



Best wishes to the 
Qraduating Class of 

1955 



% 




6 - 8 Court St. 



OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS 




I 




mm 



I 



Congratulations to the Class of 1955 

Plymouth Recapping, Inc. 

63 HIGH STREET 
PLYMOUTH, MASS. 

Guy Brigida Peter Brigida 


Compliments of 

THE SAMOSET HOUSE 


Compliments 
of 


/pWtOUTH. /*VASS (ST. |«00 

"Fifty Years of Serving Plymouth" 
61 and 63 Main Street 


fS WJUfmoutki LaAqetf V/uiq StoVi, rfl 

1 *£j4MAIN ST. Ttiatqrippn. dqencu^ TEL.2055 J"*! 




Congratulations 
of 

LELANDS 



MAURO J. CANEVAZZI 
PLYMOUTH INSURANCE AGENCY 



5 TOWN SQUARE 



PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



BEST WISHES 
TO THE CLASS OF 1955 

OLD COLONY INTERSTATE THEATRE 



PLYMOUTH HARDWARE, INC. 

and 

NERI PLUMBING CO. 



42-44 COURT STREET 



Telephone 265 



SHIRETOWN MOTORS INC. 



Sales 



&&<£ 



Service 



Water Street 



Phone 1407 



Plymouth 



Dick Haire's 
SNUG HARBOR 
ANTIQUE SHOP 

Tel. Duxbury 722 
Washington Street Duxbury, Mass. 


Compliments of 
PLYMOUTH BATTERY CO. 

1 WARREN AVE. PLYMOUTH, MASS. 
Telephone 161 




Compliments of 

PLYMOUTH & BROCKTON 
STREET RAILWAY 


BEST WISHES TO THE 

Class of 1955 

BUMPUS MACHINE SHOP 

GENERAL MACHINE WORK 
and WELDING 




Compliments of 

BARBIERI'S MARKET 

Jabez Corner Tel. 258 
• 

Quality Meats and Groceries 


PLYMOUTH ROCK GROCER? 

Phone 1198 117 Sandwich Street 

Free Delivery 




ARONS FURNITURE CO. 

J* 18 Middle St. Tel. Ply. 25 
" Everything - For 

c The - Home 

Westinghouse Appliances 


PLYMOUTH BAKING CO., Inc. 
Baked Goods Made Purely For You 

20 MARKET ST. Phone 255-M 




PLYMOUTH SUPPLY CO. 

39 COURT ST. TEL. 1423 
Plumbing — Heating — Electrical Supplies 

MANOMET HARDWARE CO. 

STATE ROAD MAN. 3335 


Compliments of 
SOUTH CENTRE MARKET 




Best Wishes To The 
Class of 1954 

KENT'S BEAUTY SALON 

19 Court St. Plymouth, Mass. 
Room 9 Tel. Ply. 794 


THE E. S. BURNS 
INSURANCE AGENCY 




Congratulations and Good Luck 

MILTON GELLER 

Men's Wear 


B R ADzJ2EY P 3 H sT 

22 COURT STREET PLYMOUTH MASS^ 
ROY B BRADLEY (fopMtted&uvvmacut 




TAVERNELLI'S BARBER SHOP 

Del and John 


Compliments of 
EDWARD C. WARNSMAN & SON 

REALTOR 

Real Estate and Insurance 

65 MAIN STREET 

Telephone 140-W, 140-R. 122-M 

Edward C. Warnsman Paul M. Warnsman 





MARIO'S 
AUTO BODY SHOP 

Mario E. Traverse Proprietor 

112 — 114 SANDWICH STREET 
Rear Pilgrim Buick-Pontiac Sales, Inc. 


Compliments of 

SEARS, ROEBUCK & CO. 

ORDER OFFICE 


Compliments of 

GOGGIN and SON 
11 COURT STREET 


^pelano and f(ejtn 

CIVIL ENGINEERS and 
SURVEYORS 

Corner of Court and Russell Streets 
Plymouth, Mass. 


Compliments 
of 

AVERY FARMS 


Middishade Manhattan. 
Clothes Sportswear 

PLYMOUTH MEN'S SHOP 

DISTINCTIVE MENSWEAR 
18 MAIN STREET, PLYMOUTH 

Mallory Holeproof 
Hats Hosiery 



NOOK FARM DAIRY 



x*-fi 




MILK 



and 



CREAM 



HEALTH BUILDER 



LOCAL MILK 



Nook Road 



Plymouth 



Telephone PLYMOUTH 1261 



Compliments of 
MEL'S AUTO REPAIR 

ESSO PRODUCTS 
109 Sandwich St. Plymouth 

MEL DIOZZI, Prop. 


Compliments of . . . 

GEORGE V. BUTTNER 
STORES 

PLYMOUTH and MARSHFIELD 


Compliments of . . . 

SARACCA'S NEWS STORE 

Leonard P. Arnold, Prop. 

36 SANDWICH STREET 


Compliments of . . . 

A. K. FINNEY CO. 


Best of Luck to the 

Class of '55 

HOLMES GROCERY 

87 SANDWICH STREET 


Best Wishes 

WESTERN AUTO 
ASSOCIATE STORE 

Telephone 2540 
63 MAIN ST. PLYMOUTH, MASS. 


Best Wishes 
For A Successful Future 

GREG'S BARBER SHOP 

37 Court St. Plymouth, Mass. 


Compliments of . . . 

THE PEOPLE'S MARKET 


PLYMOUTH ROCK CLEANERS 


THE CHILDREN'S SHOP, INC. 


Compliments of 
Plymouth Rock Trout Co. 


Old Colony Restaurant 

Bob and Eileen Deighton 







The Plymouth National Bank 

PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 





ins ^^H 


III 1' 


f 

v 1 ■ 





TOWN BROOK SERVICE STATION 

(flflfc) Mando^ 

International Sales and Service 

. . . 24-Hour Road Service . . . 
14 Water Street Plymouth 820-W 



Mty 



% 



WATCHMAKERS and JEWELERS 

Keepsake Diamonds 
Hamilton — Elgin — Longines 

25 Main Street Plymouth 



WILDES MOTOR CO., INC. 

Cadillac — Oldsmobile 

115 SANDWICH STREET PLYMOUTH, MASS. 

Telephone 1500 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

BOYER'S 
DRIVE-IN COLOR CENTER 



PURITAN CLOTHING CO. 

"MODERN STORES FOR MEN AND BOYS" 


PURITAN TAILORING DEPT. 

TAILORS — CLEANERS — FUR REP Am — FUR STORAGE 


Compliments of . . . 

JAY'S 
ARMY and NAVY STORE 

50 Court Street Plymouth, Mass. 
Tel. 337 


COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

CAPPANNARI BROS. 


WOOD'S FISH MARKET, 

RALPH F. GOODWIN, PROP. 

FRESH. SALTED AND SMOKED FISH 

Crabmeat, Scallops, Lobsters 
Oysters and Clams 

Telephone 261 Plymouth 


Compliments of 

C. P. WASHBURN CO. 

GRAIN, LUMBER & PLUMBING 


CONGRATULATIONS 
TO THE CLASS OF 1955 

M & M SPORTING GOODS CO. 

Tel. 1915 25 Main Street 



Compliments 
of 

SCUDDER COAL & OIL CO. 



SMITH'S 




JOHN E. JORDAN CO. 

Plymouth, Massachusetts 
Tel. 283 



Best Wishes to the Class of '55 

PILGRIM BUICK-PONTIAC SALES, Inc. 

BUICK and PONTIAC Sales and Service 

TELEPHONE 1090 
114 Sandwich Street — — Plymouth, Mass. 



GOODING'S 

JEWELERS 

Est. 1802 



Diamonds Silver 

Elgin — Gruen — Hamilton 

Radios — Gifts — Leather Goods — 

Electrical Appliances 

Expert Watch and Clock Repairing 

Tel. 429 Plymouth 18 Court St. 

Orders Taken for Class Rings 



Compliments of 




LA Dl £S 
ilPPJl FL£ L 



20 Court Street Plymouth, Mass. 



H. A. BRADFORD & SONS 

Distributor for 

S. S. PIERCE 
Specialties 

1 Warren Ave. Plymouth 

Telephone 1298-W 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

PEPSI-COLA BOTTLING CO. 
of Plymouth, Inc. 

124 Sandwich St. Tel. 863 




64 Samoset St. Plymouth 

Telephone 1013-W 



Compliments of 



VICTORIA & CASAL 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

W. MAINI & CO. 

MASON CONTRACTORS 



73 Standish Ave. 



Plymouth, Mass. 



Compliments of 
PRIMO'S SERVICE STATION 

Primo Zucchelli 
Plymouth, Mass. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

WARD & BRADY 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

RELIABLE CLEANERS 

O HOUR 

SERVICE 

Telephone 520 



Compliments of 

OLD COLONY LAUNDRY 

of Plymouth 

Master Launderers — Dry Cleaners 
18 Howland St. 



Lincoln St. Service Station 

CHARLES CARAFOLI 
Cor. LINCOLN & SANDWICH STS. 
Phone 2009 Plymouth, Mass. 



Northeastern University 



BOSTON 15, MASSACHUSETTS 



You are cordially invited to explore the advantages of 

CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION 

Nearly 3000 young men and women now enrolled as upper- 
classmen in the DAY COLLEGES at NORTHEASTERN 
are profiting from study on the CO-OPERATIVE PLAN. 

Programs lead to the degrees of 
Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



The combination of academic instruction at NORTHEASTERN and supervised 
co-operative employment in business, industry, and the social agencies consti- 
tutes sound preparation for a wide variety of responsible positions. 

"Co-op" students earn a major portion of their college expenses. 

EVENING DIVISION 

Programs available in the fields of Liberal Arts, Business, 
and Engineering lead to appropriate bachelor or associate degrees. 



SEPTEMBER REGISTRATION 



SCHOLARSHIPS 



FOR CATALOG 
NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

Director of Admissions 
Boston 15, Massachusetts 

Please send me a catalog. I am particularly interested 



MAIL THIS COUPON 



the 



DAY COLLEGES 

□ College of Education □ 

□ College of Liberal Arts □ 

□ College of Engineering □ 

□ College of Business Administration 



EVENING SCHOOLS 
Evening Division of the College of Liberal Arts 
School of Business (Evening Sessions) 
Lincoln Institute (Engineering Courses) 



Name. 
Addre; 



(Street) 



(City or Town) 



(P. O. Numerals) 



(Slate) 



THIS MARK 

DESIGNED f PRINTED Is your guarantee of . . . 
X^/p^K^Ar / SATISFACTORY work by 

Wf^RlAlW 
Si press nL a 1 2 5 yeaT old ^ rm nnanc ~ 

nl^MAii!n?fT ially strong with a record of 
fM^U^oiin, Successful performance. 


THE ROGERS PRINT 

Complete Printing Service 

20 Middle St. Tel. 165-M 
Plymouth, Mass. 


THE HOBSHOLE HOUSE 

and MOTEL 

AN INN WITH 
EARLY AMERICAN CHARM 

212 Sandwich St. Tel. 1153 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis J. O'Neill 


SAMOSET GARAGE, INC. 

CHRYSLER — PLYMOUTH We Buy and Sell 
Sales and Service Good Used Cars 


Compliments of 

Perino's Service Station 

PLYMOUTH, MASS. 


PLYMOUTH ROCK 
BOWL-O-MAT 

(Automatic Pinsetters) 
BOWLING AT ITS BEST 



BEST WISHES 
TO THE CLASS OF 1955 

EDES MANUFACTURING 
COMPANY 

PLYMOUTH, MASS. 


SEARS' FUEL CO. 

PLYMOUTH 1214 
"Let The Green Fleet Deliver Your Heat" 


MARTHA'S GIFT & TOY SHOP 

HOBBIES — PHONOGRAPH RECORDS 

300 Court Street No. Plymouth 
Plymouth 2109-R 


Best Wishes to the Class of '55 
CHERRY'S SERVICE STATION 

WATER STREET Plymouth 2100 


Compliments of 

STANDISH MOTORS, INC. 

DeSOTO — PLYMOUTH 
Lifetime Guaranteed 
Used Cars 


Compliments 
of 

BLUEBIRD CAFE 

158 Water Street Plymouth 


The New! — The Bigger! 

SADOW'S 

Always the Newest in 
Fashions for Girls of All Ages! 


Kingston 2183 — 2275 Sales and Service 
Nights: Kingston 2001 — Duxbury 757 Delco — Timken 

L. E. BOUCHARD CO., INC. 

PLUMBING — HEATING — FUEL OILS 

82 Main Street Kingston, Mass. 



Compliments of . . . 
Carol Avery Sturgis 

E. E. AVERY INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 

27 COURT STREET 


PARK AVE. SERVICE STATION 

Socony — Vacuum Products 

Cor. Court and No. Park Ave. 
Phone 1550 


Best Wishes to the Class of '55 
THOMAS R. HOGAN 


Compliments of 
R. J. MAROIS 


Compliments of 

PLYMOUTH ROCK HARDWARE 

62 Court St. Phone 951 


'MCE CREAM 

Favorably Known for 70 Years and Still in a Class 

By Itself 

"Made For Particular People" 

131 Eliot Street Milton 87, Mass. 

BLuehills 8-7850 
10% Nelson Street Plymouth, Mass. 

Plymouth 160 


Compliments of 

CARTMELL & FRIES 

FUNERAL HOME 


Zanello Furniture Co. 

ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES 

FURNITURE 

CUSTOM UPHOLSTERY 

84 Court St. Tel. 1485 



Plymouth Federal 
Savings and Loan Association 

PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 
Inc. 1882 Fed. 1937 



President 
James R. Chandler 

Vice President 
Harry R. Talbot 



Executive Vice President 
Robert J. Tubbs 

Treasurer and Secretary 
Walder J. Engstrom 



Assistant Treasurers 
A. Lee Roulston Fred C. Brown 

Assistant Secretary 
Mae E. Emond 










At Your Service For 
INSURED SAFETY FOR SAVINGS 

HOME MORTGAGES LOANS PLANS 
Planned for Your Buderet 



Portable Radios Record Players 

Seat Covers Appliances 

Tires 

New — Used — Recapped 

Wiggin Tire & Home 

Supply Co. 

180 Court St. Plymouth 960 


Cape Insurance Agency and 
Cape Travel Agency 

Amedeo V. Sgarzi Orfeo H. Sgarzi 
Enrico Ferrari Henry A. Ferrari 

4 Court St. Plymouth, Mass. 
Tel. 66 

Book your vacation trip 
in Plymouth 


Compliments of 

BELL SHOPS 

12 Court St. 
Plymouth, Mass. 


LINOLEUM TILES 

'ffyeKfUft ?cviHitune @*. 

Tel. 1118 

WESTINGHOUSE APPLIANCES 

40 COURT ST. PLYMOUTH, MASS. 


PLYMOUTH LUMBER CO. 

BUILDING MATERIALS OF ALL KINDS 

Telephone 237 


Compliments of . . . 

PLYMOUTH ELECTRONICS 

Tel. 213-M 54 Court St. 


EVELYN M. REARDON 

BEAUTY SALON 

Room 10 Buttner Bldg. 
Tel. 245 


STEVENS THE FLORIST 

STORE PHONE . 278-W 

GREENHOUSE . 278-R 

PLYMOUTH, MASS. 


Congratulations to the Class of '55 

COLONIAL RESTAURANT 

39 Main Street 
Plymouth, Mass. 




Compliments of 

/five CENTS 

SAVINGS BANK 

INCORPORATED /8S5 

PLYMOUTH MASSACHUSETTS 




ARE YOU AVAILING YOURSELF 

OF THE 

VARIOUS SERVICES 

OF THIS 

FRIENDLY SAVINGS BANK 




PLYMOUTH SAVINGS BANK 

The Friendly Bank" 




TO 
THE GRADUATES OF 

1955 



PRINTERS AND LITHOGRAPHERS 




=^0 



PRINTERS 
OF THIS PUBLICATION 



Junction Routes 3 and 44 — Plymouth, Mass. — Tels. 775 - 656 




PLYMOUTH CORDAGE COMPANY 

PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 

Established 1824 



ROPE - BALER TWINE - BINDER TWINE - TYING TWINE - TWISTED PAPER PRODUCTS 



THE BUSINESS STAFF 



Best Wishes 
DEXTER'S SHOE STORE 

Footwear for 

THE ENTIRE FAMILY 

Tel. 165-W 16 Court St. 



PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS SINCE 1885 



-5 COOPERS h 



' OF PLYMOUTH ' 

1 COURT STREET 46 MAIN ST. EXT. 

PHONE 440 PHONE 190 

W Ashler Cooper. Reg Ph Jules H. Toupin. Reg. Ph. 



TWO FRIENDLY Jte*/a££ STOKES 



Plymouth. M»ss 



Compliments of . . . 
STODDARD & TALBOT 

"Insurance That Insures" 

PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



THE CLASS of 1955 



North Plymouth Merchants' 
Association 



Alves Shoe Store 
I. Benotti & Sons 
Broccoli's Market 
Canevazzi's Market 
Cantoni Oil Co. 
Knife's Grocery 
Contente's Shoe Store 
Cross Construction Co. 
Danforth's Home Bakery 
A. Maccaferri 
Mando's Furniture Store 
North Plymouth Garage 
Padovani's Pharmacy 
North Plymouth Hardware 
Perry's Market 



Puritan Garage 

John Scalabroni 

Sherman Funiture, Inc. 

Sheehan's 

Star Lunch 

Stein Furniture Co. 

Shwom Bros. 

Royal Palm Doughnut Shop 

Valente Florist 

Volta Oil Co. 

Fred Volta 

Ernie's Grill 

L. Ceccarelli, Tailor 

J. and A. Almeida 

Seaside Grill 



<pfnm$0$ 



Mary's Beauty Shop 

Mr. and Mrs. Harris B. Cohen 

John Hamilton, Inc. 

Dr. Thomas D. Gorham 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Dempsey 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Melahoures 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Fortini 

Mr. and Mrs. Leo J. Caron 

Mr. and Mrs. Mando Borgatti 

Mr. and Mrs. A. R. Alberghini 

Mrs. Primo Zucchelli 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Barrett 

Mr. and Mrs. Dewey DeBrusk 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul M. Warnsman 

Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Stefani 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Fernandes 

Mr. and Mrs. Eldred B. Bates 

Mr. and Mrs. Adelno Benassi 

Deolinda Costa 

Mrs. Margaret Healy 

Helen M. Bagnall 

Iris E. Albertini 

William D. Resnick 

Mrs. John W. Reed 

Middle Street Motors 



Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Mitchell, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur G. Estes, Jr. 

Mrs. Glen Gray 

Cecilia Geoffroy and Stu Gulhang 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy E. Beaman 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Zaval 

Mrs. Emilio Maffini 

Nellie R. Locklin 

Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Roby 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur W. Beane 

Darsch's Beauty Shop 

Mr. and Mrs. Mario J. Romano 

Mr. and Mrs. Rego Petocchi 

Mr. and Mrs. Ido Ruffini 

Russell F. Sears 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Shaw 

Child's Chicken Farm 

Mr. and Mrs. Elpalet C. Gardner 

Mrs. Frank A. Vancini 

Mrs. James S. Swanton 

Harmon Nursery Home 

Mr. and Mrs. Elio Barufaldi 

Louis' Barber Shop 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Sherman 

Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Miskelly 







Caro)